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I am maintaining some legacy Visual Basic ASP code and I keep seeing <% ...code here... %> and I do not understand what this is used for. It seems to be some sort of blocking method but I cannot be sure and Google has been of no help because it is an odd search string. I realize this is a very "basic" question but any quick answer would be great.

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Are you talking about Active Server Pages using VBScript? –  p.campbell Jun 18 '12 at 1:45
    
I didn't know it was an ASP thing. See my comment on the answer. –  Brandon Bearden Jun 18 '12 at 1:59
    
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about basic reading and not about programming –  SergeS Mar 3 at 8:10
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closed as unclear what you're asking by p.campbell, Dour High Arch, andrewsi, SergeS, Abbas Mar 3 at 8:17

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The <% %> tags are not part of Visual Basic Scripting, they is part of ASP.

They are called ASP Code Blocks.

Also, you're more than likely working with VBScript which is a different language from BASIC.

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Here's the link for classic ASP (not to be confused with ASP.NET): msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms524929.aspx –  Kane Jun 18 '12 at 1:51
    
@Kane thank you, updated my link. –  mawburn Jun 18 '12 at 1:53
    
Thank you for your response. I have no idea why people down voted me on this. I tried to figure this out on my own and wouldn't have posted a question if I hadn't tired on my own. I don't know ASP or VB at ALL. I am a php developer. I have never used ASP before this. –  Brandon Bearden Jun 18 '12 at 1:59
    
@BrandonBearden Essentially, they are almost the same thing as <?php ... ?> –  mawburn Jun 18 '12 at 2:01
    
Thank you very much for your response. –  Brandon Bearden Jun 18 '12 at 2:02
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