Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want something like the following but would like it to be reusable for different classes.

How do I refactor this code, so with minimal effort it can be included in a class and that class will automatically be collecting instances whenever new is called?

I've tried all sorts of things like overriding new or initialize but just can't get the magic to happen.

   class Person      
      @@people_instances = []

      def initialize
         @@people_instances << self
      end

      def self.instances
         @@people_instances
      end

   end


People.new
People.new
Poople.instances

 => [#<Person:0x000001071a7e28>, #<Person:0x000001071a3828>] 

After some feedback below, I don't think the answer is to put the instances in a class variable as it will stay in memory forever. Rails cache is also not so appropriate as I don't need the instances to persist.

The following code uses class instance variables instead of class variables.

http://www.dzone.com/snippets/class-variables-vs-class

class Employee
  class << self; attr_accessor :instances; end
  def store
    self.class.instances ||= []
    self.class.instances << self
  end
  def initialize name
    @name = name
  end
end
class Overhead < Employee; end
class Programmer < Employee; end
Overhead.new('Martin').store
Overhead.new('Roy').store
Programmer.new('Erik').store
puts Overhead.instances.size    # => 2
puts Programmer.instances.size  # => 1

Will these instance variables be unique to every rails request or will they persist?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

UPDATED ANSWER

If you want to keep it available during the request alone, none of the previous answers can do it. The solution for keeping it available only during the request-response cycle is to use a thread-local that is assigned in a controller method, example:

class YourController < ApplicationController

  around_filter :cache_objects

  protected

  def cache_objects
    Thread.current[:my_objects] = ['my-object', 'my-other-object']
    yield
    ensure
      Thread.current[:my_objects]
  end

end

Then, at the code that needs it, you just do Thread.current[:my_objects] and do whatever you would like to do with them. You need to use an around_filter because your web framework or server structure could try to reuse threads and the only real solution is to clean them up once the request is done to avoid memory leaks.


OLD ANSWER

Not sure what you're trying to do, but you can easily pick every single instance of a class using ObjectSpace:

ObjectSpace.each_object(String) { |s| puts(s) }

If what you need is as a database cache just use the Rails cache, load these objects once and then keep them in the cache. When using the Rails cache all you need to do is send your objects to the cache:

Rails.cache.write( "my_cached_objects", [ 'first-object', 'second-object' ] )

And then get them somewhere else:

Rails.cache.fetch("my_cached_objects") do 
  # generate your objects here if there was a cache miss
  [ 'first-object', 'second-object' ]
end

As you can see, you don't even have to call cache.write, you can just use fetch and whenever there is a cache miss the block given will be called and your objects will be created.

You can read more about rails caching here and you can see all supported methods of the ActiveSupport::Cache::Store here.

Another method without using ObjectSpace but still with an ugly solution, now using alias_method:

module Counter

  def self.included( base )
    base.extend(ClassMethods)
    base.class_eval do
      alias_method :initialize_without_counter, :initialize
      alias_method :initialize, :initialize_with_counter
    end
  end

  def count_class_variable_name
    :"@@#{self.class.name.downcase}_instances"
  end

  def initialize_with_counter( *args )
    unless self.class.class_variable_defined?(count_class_variable_name)
      self.class.class_variable_set(count_class_variable_name, [])
    end

    self.class.class_variable_get(count_class_variable_name) << self
    initialize_without_counter(*args)
  end

  module ClassMethods

    def all_instances
      class_variable_get(:"@@#{name.downcase}_instances")
    end

  end

end


class Person

  def initialize
    puts 'new person'
  end

  include Counter

end

p1 = Person.new
p2 = Person.new
p3 = Person.new

puts Person.all_instances.size
share|improve this answer
    
I started with that but I read that you might get old objects that haven't been GC'd yet. Can anyone confirm this? –  Tim Jun 18 '12 at 3:09
    
Yes, that's possible. What are you trying to do? Why do you want to have access to the instances? It's much simpler if you explain what you want to do and then there might be a better how. –  Maurício Linhares Jun 18 '12 at 3:13
1  
Updated the answer again, if what you need is a database cache, why don't you just use the Rails cache? –  Maurício Linhares Jun 18 '12 at 3:29
1  
More info on caching usual objects added now. –  Maurício Linhares Jun 18 '12 at 3:47
1  
@Tim well, this new information invalidated the previous answer. Added another answer now. –  Maurício Linhares Jun 18 '12 at 12:17

lib/keeper.rb

def initialize
  instance_eval "@@#{self.class.to_s.downcase}_instances ||= []"
  instance_eval "@@#{self.class.to_s.downcase}_instances << self"
end

def self.instances
  return class_eval "@@#{self.to_s.downcase}_instances"
end

person.rb

class Person
  eval File.open('./lib/keeper.rb','rb').read
end

Then this works:

Person.new
Person.new
Person.instances
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like your missing the code. –  Tim Jun 18 '12 at 3:08
    
@Tim Sorry, got pulled away while entering the response. –  Anil Jun 18 '12 at 3:40
    
@DaveNewton The answer is ready for inspection now! I am sure you can help improve it. Thanks. –  Anil Jun 18 '12 at 3:42
    
Thanks @Anil but I think Maurício Linhares post above more satisfies the question since the idea you propose is still inside the Person class. –  Tim Jun 18 '12 at 3:47
    
@Tim Yes, Mauricio solution is much more comprehensive. I have moved it out of the Person class, but converting to a Module is much more acceptable than to eval a file. Interesting exercise! Good luck! –  Anil Jun 18 '12 at 4:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.