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im trying to learn delegates and events in c#, i understand that an event is some sort of a wrapper for a delegate and a delegate is a pointer for functions/methods...

below is my code but when i run it, nothing is being shown... what could be the problems?

public class ClassHandler
{
    public delegate void DoProcesses();
    public event DoProcesses DoProcessesEvent;
}

public class Class1
{
    public void Func1()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Class 1 doing function 1");
    }
    public void Func2()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Class 1 doing function 2");
    }

}

public class Class2
{
    public void Func1()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Class 2 doing function 1");
    }
    public void Func2()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Class 2 doing function 2");
    }

}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Class1 cs1 = new Class1();
        Class2 cs2 = new Class2();
        ClassHandler main = new ClassHandler();
        main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(cs1.Func1);
        main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(cs1.Func2);
        main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(cs2.Func1);
        main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(cs2.Func2);
        main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(ff); // this line here is causing an error: An object reference is required for the non-static field, method, or property 'TryDelegatesAndEvents.Program.ff()'    

        Console.Read();
    }
    public void ff()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("gggg");
    }
}

UPDATE: how do i raise the event so it will execute the methods already?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Problem with this line: main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(ff)

That is because your method ff() is a non-static method and you can't access it directly like that from a static method.

Make your method ff as static, or create and object of the containing class and assign the method with an instance of it.

For Comments: The reason you are not seeing anything is because you are just binding them to an event DoProcessesEvent, but you are not raising the event any where. You are only defining the handler for the event.

EDIT: Change your ClassHandler class to:

public class ClassHandler
{
    public delegate void DoProcesses();
    public event DoProcesses DoProcessesEvent;

    public void OnDoProcessEvent()
    {
        if (DoProcessesEvent != null)
            DoProcessesEvent();
    }
}

In your Main method before Console.Read(); Type:

main.OnDoProcessEvent();

This will raise the event and it will handled from the application and will give you the following output.

Class 1 doing function 1
Class 1 doing function 2
Class 2 doing function 1
Class 2 doing function 2
gggg
share|improve this answer
    
however, upon removing that line... i still see nothing in the console upon running it... – Roj Beraña Jun 18 '12 at 5:06
    
i made it static but gggg is still not shown – Roj Beraña Jun 18 '12 at 5:08
    
could you give an example on how to raise that event? – Roj Beraña Jun 18 '12 at 5:13
1  
@eaon21, check the edited answer – Habib Jun 18 '12 at 5:18

change main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(ff); to main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(new Program().ff); or make ff static

share|improve this answer
    
i made it static but gggg is still not shown – Roj Beraña Jun 18 '12 at 5:08
    
you have delegated a task but did not tell when to execute – hungryMind Jun 18 '12 at 5:45

Well it does not compile due to the line:

main.DoProcessesEvent += new ClassHandler.DoProcesses(ff); 

The error VS spits out is that:

An object reference is required for the non-static field, method, or property 'ConsoleApplication2.Program.ff()'

Just change your ff() method to be static to get around it.

Eg:

public static void ff()
{
    Console.WriteLine("gggg");
}
share|improve this answer
    
okay, made it static, no errors already but nothing is shown in the console upon running it... – Roj Beraña Jun 18 '12 at 5:11

Besides the problem pointed out in earlier comments, You have to trigger the event.

make a copy of an event before you check it for null and fire it. This will eliminate a potential problem with threading where the event becomes null at the location right between where you check for null and where you fire the event:

// Copy the event delegate before checking/calling

EventHandler copy = DoProcessesEvent ;  
if (copy != null)     
   copy(this, EventArgs.Empty); // Call any handlers on the copied list 

This will ensure that your event fires and you will get the result.

share|improve this answer

Just to add to @Habib's answer, it would be fairly unusual to subscribe instance class methods as event handlers of an object potentially in another scope (e.g. what happens if Class1 goes out of scope, yet main() still has a subscription?). A more common scenario would be to subscribe (and de-subscribe) handlers in the same scope, often in an asynchronous manner (the below events are still raised synchronously).

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public delegate void ProcessCompletedEvent(string description);

    public class Class1
    {
        public void Func1()
        {
            // Do Func1 work
            Thread.Sleep(500);
            RaiseEvent("Func1 completed");
        }
        public void Func2()
        {
            // Do Func2 work
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            RaiseEvent("Func2 completed");
        }
        private void RaiseEvent(string description)
        {
            if (ProcessCompleted != null)
            {
                ProcessCompleted(description);
            }
        }

        public event ProcessCompletedEvent ProcessCompleted;
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Class1 cs1 = new Class1();

            // Wire up event handler
            cs1.ProcessCompleted += new ProcessCompletedEvent(MyHandler);

            cs1.Func1();
            cs1.Func2();

            Console.Read();
            // Remove the subscription
            cs1.ProcessCompleted -= MyHandler;
        }

        // *** Is in the same scope as main, which subscribes / desubscribes
        public static void MyHandler(string description)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(description);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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