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let's say I have a html structure like this -> (note: in my code there are no IDs, i just put them here so it's easier to explain)

  <body>
    <table id=a>
      <tr>
        <td>
          <table id=b>
            <tr>
              <td>
              </td>
            </tr>
          </table>
        </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
    <table id=c>
      <tr>
        <td>
        </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </body>

Using XPath, //body/table[1] gives me the inner table with the id "b", but what I really want is it's first child ("c"). Something along th lines of $("body >table").eq(1) but i'm using c#. How do I do that using XPath?

Tnx!

EDIT: it is not an option me to select the [2] element, since this is only a simplified explanation of the problem i'm heaving...

Andrej

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have a look at this question stackoverflow.com/questions/8713177/… –  masterchris_99 Jun 18 '12 at 5:44
    
Isn't the first element 0? //body/table[0] –  Vale Jun 18 '12 at 5:46
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The element selectors starts from index 1 (and not from 0). Hence you will have to use the xpath query //body/table[2]

Here is the explanation with screen shots.

For 0 based index node will be null;

enter image description here

But since the index starts with 1, for indeces 1 and 2 these nodes will be returned

enter image description here

enter image description here

Still not convinced? Let's check for the inner table element.

First let's check with 0 based index (again it is going to be null)

enter image description here

However when the index is 1 it will return the correct node

enter image description here

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Try

//body/table[not(ancestor::td)]
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