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What's the nicest way to convert a Vector to an Array in Actionscript3?

The normal casting syntax doesn't work:

var myVector:Vector.<Foo> = new Vector();
var myArray:Array = Array(myVector); // calls the top-level function Array()

due to the existance of the Array function. The above results in an array, but it's an array with a single element consisting of the original Vector.

Which leaves the slightly more verbose:

var myArray:Array = new Array();
for each (var elem:Foo in myVector) {
    myArray.push(elem);
}

which is fine, I guess, though a bit wordy. Is this the canonical way to do it, or is there a toArray() function hiding somewhere in the standard library?

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for(var i:int; i < muVector.length; ++i){} may be faster. But there is no other solution. –  Dykam Jul 10 '09 at 9:04
3  
Also, using myArray[myArray.length] = elem; is faster than using push(). –  rzetterberg Jul 10 '09 at 12:36
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8 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

your approach is the fastest ... if you think it's to verbose, then build a utility function ... :)

edit:

To build a utility function, you will probably have to drop the type as follows:

function toArray(iterable:*):Array {
     var ret:Array = [];
     for each (var elem:Foo in iterable) ret.push(elem);
     return ret;
}
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Building a utility function isn't an option since it couldn't apply to any type of Vector... unless anyone knows of a way to make a function that takes as a parameter ANY type of Vector? –  IQpierce Aug 4 '11 at 20:05
2  
@IQpierce: Answer updated. –  back2dos Aug 4 '11 at 20:17
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There is a function called forEach which both Vector and Array has which you can use. Basically it calls a function for each element in the vector. This is how it works:

var myVector:Vector.<Foo> = new Vector();
var myArray:Array = [];

myVector.forEach(arrayConverter);

function arrayConverter(element:*, index:int, array:Array):void{
    myArray[myArray.length] = element;
}

But I couldn't find a function which just moves all the values from the Vector to an Array. Another solution could be that you create a class which extends the Vector class and then you have a public function called toArray() and then you have that code in that function so you don't have to write it each time you want to convert.

Vector documentation

Edit: Found this old question today and thought it would be interesting to do a benchmark test of all the different methods this sunday morning.

I used a vector with 1000000 items in and made 2 tests for each loop. One using the built in array functions push and one using regular array operations.

  • For loop, not push: 520 ms
  • For loop, push: 1027 ms
  • Foreach loop, not push: 1753 ms
  • Foreach loop, push: 2264 ms
  • While loop, not push: 2775 ms
  • While loop, not push: 3282 ms
  • Util loop, not push: 4059 ms
  • Util loop, push: 4570 ms

And here is a benchmark using 1000 items:

  • For loop, not push: 1 ms
  • For loop, push: 2 ms
  • Foreach loop, not push: 2 ms
  • Foreach loop, push: 3 ms
  • While loop, not push: 3 ms
  • While loop, not push: 4 ms
  • Util loop, not push: 4 ms
  • Util loop, push: 5 ms

Basically it's when you get over 10 000 items you start to see the real difference. So between 0 and 10 000 items it doesn't really matter which you use.

package
{
    public class Loops{
        public static function forLoop(vector:Vector.<Foo>, usePush:Boolean = false):Array{
            var result:Array = [];

            for(var i:int = 0; i < vector.length; i++){
                if(usePush){
                    result.push(vector[i]);
                }else{
                    result[result.length] = vector[i];
                }
            }

            return result;          
        }

        public static function foreachLoop(vector:Vector.<Foo>, usePush:Boolean):Array{
            var result:Array = [];

            for each(var key:String in vector){
                if(usePush){
                    result.push(vector[key]);
                }else{
                    result[result.length] = vector[key];
                }
            }

            return result;          
        }

        public static function whileLoop(vector:Vector.<Foo>, usePush:Boolean):Array{
            var result:Array = [];

            var i:int = 0;
            while(i < vector.length){
                if(usePush){
                    result.push(vector[i]);
                }else{
                    result[result.length] = vector[i];
                }
            }

            return result;                      
        }

        public static function arrayUtilLoop(vector:Vector.<Foo>, usePush:Boolean):Array{
            var result:Array = [];

            function arrayUtilForeach(element:*, index:int, array:Array):void{
                if(usePush){
                    array.push(element);
                }else{
                    array[result.length] = element;
                }
            }           

            vector.forEach(arrayUtilForeach);

            return result;          
        }
    }
}

I used the getTimer function to do the benchmark, so it might not be 100% accurate but there's so much difference between the different loops so I don't think it matters.

I hope someone found this useful.

share|improve this answer
    
very nice, but extremely slow ... you realize how many calls this makes? –  back2dos Jul 10 '09 at 8:04
    
yes, in my opinion it's nicer than using a for/for each loop. It's a function call for each element in the Vector. How much slower exactly is this approach? –  rzetterberg Jul 10 '09 at 12:35
    
you don't want to call myVector.length in every loop. by removing it i've more than doubled the performance, pastebin.com/0waTqaER checking length each time = 491 not checking length each time = 209 –  1.21 gigawatts Jul 27 '11 at 15:05
    
@gigawatts Perfect! Thanks for sharing :) –  rzetterberg Jul 27 '11 at 18:58
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Vaukalak second answer not only works but is much faster than the top voted answer here, I've massaged it a little as [] produces fractionally faster array construction than new Array(). Also included below is the best way to create a Vector from an Array too.

// make a Vector from an array
var toVector : Vector.<String> = Vector.<String>(['a','b','c']) 

// populate an array from a Vector
var toArray : Array = [].concat(toVector);

Please note, this only seems to work with flash 11

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3  
This actually constructs a one-element array with the vector as the first value. –  jameshfisher May 16 '13 at 17:57
    
How does this wrong answer have so many votes? As jameshfisher points out, the behavior is incorrect. Is StackOverflow turning into a trolling site? –  Jonathan Feb 5 at 18:40
    
@Jonathan, the answer to your first question is that this is a flash related question. The majority of the community are very junior developers. –  Technik Empire Mar 18 at 10:40
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use:

var myArray:Array = [];
myArray.push.apply(null, myVector);

or

var myArray:Array = new Array().concat(myVector);
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for each will not guarantee that the order of your items will be the same.
for in should give you a closer match.

    private var _vector:*;

    public function VectorUtil(vector:*)
    {
        _vector = vector;
    }

    public function toArray():Array
    {
        var a:Array = [];
        for (var i:int = 0; i < _vector.length; ++i)
            a.push(_vector[i]);
        return a;
    }
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a function call for each element in the Vector would be a LOT slower, particularly in a longer Vector. however, these examples are probably all equivalent, unless you're dealing with a fairly long Vector/Array -- legibility and ease of use are generally more important than optimization.

that said, i think the fastest way is to use a while loop with an iterator compared against 0.

var myArray:Array = new Array(myVector.length);
var i:int=myVector.length;
while (i--) {
    myArray[i] = myVector[i];
}

unfortunately, you can't stuff this technique into a method for ease of repeated use, because there's no way to specify a Vector method parameter of a generic base type.... :(

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If you have a vector of strings, you could do:

myArray = myVec.join(",").split(",");

for a quick and dirty Array conversion.

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3  
What if your strings have commas in them? –  Brian Genisio Nov 1 '10 at 17:36
    
the splitter doesn't matter, so myVect.join(":|:").split(":|:") works just as well... –  Tyler Wright Nov 20 '10 at 15:09
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var a:Array = some_vector as Array;

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A Vector cannot be casted as an Array. This code would return null. –  Mexican Seafood Sep 25 '12 at 15:22
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