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Why the result of the fallowing code is:

Class A
Class A
Class A

public class A {
    public virtual void f() {
        Console.WriteLine("Class A");
    }
}
public class B : A {
    public virtual void f() {
        Console.WriteLine("Class B");
    }
}
public class C : B {
    public override void f() {
        Console.WriteLine("Class C");
    }
}
//...
static void Main(string[] args) {
    A[] array = new A[3];
    array[0] = new A();
    array[1] = new B();
    array[2] = new C();
    for(int d = 0; d < 3; d++)
        array[d].f();
}
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1  
if this is a homework question put the "homework" tag please –  user123_456 Jun 18 '12 at 7:16
    
Result isn't A A A, its Class A Class A Class A. –  Reniuz Jun 18 '12 at 7:21
    
It's not a homework, i read it in a book and i did not understand why that result. –  Ionescu Robert Jun 18 '12 at 7:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It's because virtual does not equals to override. By using virtual keyword you essentially creating new method, which is virtual but it is new to your class(class B) and does not override class's A method. Class C which is inherited from B doesn't know about class's A method f() so it takes B.f() to override it. And in the Main method you are creating an array of A classes where only A.f() method exists. If you want

Class A  
Class B  
Class C

output use override instead of virtual in class B.

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1  
I think he is asking why does he gets A A A as an output. –  user123_456 Jun 18 '12 at 7:20
1  
You're right, fixed that –  Blablablaster Jun 18 '12 at 7:22

AAA because

A[] array = new A[3]; /*main reference to A object*/
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