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The title more or less says it all. I create a widget, add it to QTabWidget and when I switch to the new tab the app crashes.

preferencestab.h (The widget I want to add)

#ifndef PREFERENCESTAB_H
#define PREFERENCESTAB_H

#include <QWidget>

#include "tab.h"

class PreferencesTab : public QWidget
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    explicit PreferencesTab(QWidget *parent = 0);
    ~PreferencesTab();
    int num;

private:


private slots:
};

#endif // PREFERENCESTAB_H

preferencestab.cpp

#include "preferencestab.h"

#include <QDebug>

PreferencesTab::PreferencesTab(QWidget *parent) : QWidget(parent)
{
}

PreferencesTab::~PreferencesTab()
{

}

tabmanager.cpp (subclass of QTabWidget and where I add the new tab)

...
void TabManager::openPreferences()
{
    PreferencesTab *pref = new PreferencesTab();
    int index = this->addTab(pref, "Edit");

    this->setCurrentIndex(index); // It crashes on this line
}

If I remove the line where it crashed it succeeds at creating the new tab but crashes when I manually switch to it.

It must be something stupid but I just can't find the error. Help Please

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What does your debugger say about what happens on that line? –  cmannett85 Jun 18 '12 at 8:49
    
@cbamber85 Only "The program has unexpectedly finished", Qt manage the errors somehow and it just closes. But I think something like this has happened to em before when trying to use a method of an object I thought was pointed by a pointer but in fact it is a null pointer. –  Topo Jun 18 '12 at 9:00
1  
@Topo This sounds like you aren't debugging. In QtCreator, you start the debug mode by pressing F5 instead of Ctrl-R. With "your debugger", cbamber85 didn't mean QtCreator, but GDB itself. This is a debugger which is run by QtCreator in debug mode and tells QtCreator (which then tells you) what kind of error occurred. You also can set breakpoints, step through your code and inspect the variable values (before the error occures of course). Another option is to print out the variables using qDebug. Candidates are the this pointer, pref and the index variable; check their values. –  leemes Jun 18 '12 at 9:07
1  
That said, the problem which causes the crash is most likely outside the PreferencesTab class, maybe even outside the TabManager class. That the code within a method of a class is executed doesn't mean that is was a "valid" call (= the this pointer was valid). So checking the this pointer is always a good idea to track calls to null or invalid pointers. If TabManager is a QObject, even debugging the this pointer will fail (if it is invalid), because qDebug() << this will ask for the metaObject(), which will be (most likely) an invalid read if the this pointer is invalid. –  leemes Jun 18 '12 at 9:14
    
Thanks a lot @leemes you really helped. It appears that the error was caused because I was doing a dynamic_cast to the wrong type so it returned a null pointer. –  Topo Jun 18 '12 at 9:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try to debug your application.

In QtCreator, you start the debug mode by pressing F5 (⌘-Y on macs) instead of Ctrl-R. This will launch a debugger (e.g. GDB) which tells QtCreator (which then tells you) what kind of error occurred. You also can set breakpoints, step through your code and inspect the variable values (before the error occures of course).

Another option is to print out the variables using qDebug. Candidates are the this pointer, pref and the index variable; check their values.

That said, the problem which causes the crash is most likely outside the PreferencesTab class, maybe even outside the TabManager class. That the code within a method of a class is executed doesn't mean that is was a "valid" call (= the this pointer was valid). So checking the this pointer is always a good idea to track calls to null or invalid pointers.

If TabManager is a QObject, even debugging the this pointer will fail (if it is invalid), because qDebug() << this will ask for the metaObject(), which will be (most likely) an invalid read if the this pointer is invalid.

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