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Several elements with the same ID responding to one CSS ID selector

Below is the example code that I was testing and I got confused. Every one says that we can use or we should use only one time per id, but I have testes using using it multiple times but its giving me the correct output.

What should I do?

It's kinda working same like class for me in this example

code:

<html>
<head>
<style>

#exampleID1 { background-color: blue; } 
#exampleID2 { text-transform: uppercase; } 

</style>
</head>
<body>
<p id="exampleID1">This paragraph has an ID name of "exampleID1" and has a blue CSS defined background.</p>
<p id="exampleID2">This paragraph has an ID name of "exampleID2" and has had its text transformed to uppercase letters.</p>

<address id="exampleID1">

Written by W3Schools.com<br />
<a href="mailto:us@example.org">Email us</a><br />
Address: Box 564, Disneyland<br />
Phone: +12 34 56 78
</address>


<blockquote id="exampleID1">
Here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation.
</blockquote>

</body>
</html>

Please see the above code and answer me that why we should not use id selector two times in a page while its working fine.

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marked as duplicate by BoltClock Aug 2 '12 at 17:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
CSS doesn't really care if you use ID's and classes. Javascript cares. Javascript cares a lot. –  SpaceBeers Jun 18 '12 at 9:09
1  
Just because you can doesn't mean you should. –  BoltClock Jun 18 '12 at 9:18
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5 Answers

An id must be unique in a page. Use a class if you want to describe a group of elements.

why we should not use id selector two times in a page while its working fine.

You are making an error and depending on every browser that will ever view the page to compensate for it. You can't be sure they all will.

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1  
And especially JavaScript will break depending on what you do with duplicate IDs. The fact that only one element with a given ID exists allows the browser to make all kinds of assumptions/optimizations when traversing the tree. –  ThiefMaster Jun 18 '12 at 9:09
    
thank you for clearing my doubt. –  gaurav rathor Jun 18 '12 at 11:57
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It's working, but that's not the way IDs are meant to be used (according to the HTML specifications). An ID must refer only to one object. Describing multiple objects must be done with class, not id.

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I think the easier way to you understand is doing an analogy with a product. Imagine that an ID works like a Serial Number, in other words, it must be unique, this way you can identify a product that have milions of equal copies.

Then, imagine the class as the Product Code, can be the bar code for example. In a supermarket all equal products have the same bar code to be read by optical reader.

So, an ID is an unique identifiquer and a class groups a group of elements.

But if i am using the same ID in my HTML/CSS i am get a perfect result, why should i be worried about unique IDs?

Reason number 1:

In the future, if you need to use Javascript and if you need to manipulate an specific element and it has a duplicated ID, your code will not generate the expected result.

Reason number 2

Your code will not be valited by W3C, what means that you can have headaches with your website's compability accross browsers. It can works fine in one browser and in other not.

Using a real example, imagine that you want to update dinamically, using Javascript, the text of this element:

<blockquote id="exampleID1">
Here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation here is a long quotation.
</blockquote>

With Javascript/JQuery you will use a code like this:

$("#exampleID1").html("Changing element content");

And then the text of the element <blockquote id="exampleID1"> will be updated, but the below element will be updated too, because it has the same ID.

<p id="exampleID1">This paragraph has an ID name of "exampleID1" and has a blue CSS defined background.</p>

So, if you want to update just one element, they must have unique IDs.

I hope you can use this explanation to understand better the difference between ID and class.

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Hi, What if I am using document.getElementbyId("result").innerhtml = d; and I want multiple divs with id="result". What is a good work around for it? –  Kala J Mar 19 at 17:55
    
@KalaJ, I think using a class um can solve this –  Marcio Simao Mar 24 at 19:20
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You should use unique Ids to ensure the HTML is valid.

The reasoning behind this is simply that Ids are used to identify unique elements.

The page will still render, despite being invalid, but the biggest practical problem is that JavaScript and other libraries are optimised to work on the assumption that Ids are unique so, if you are trying to fetch all elements with an Id and hide them e.g. using jQuery

$('#exampleID1').hide();

Only the first element will be hidden, since to select by Id should only return a single item and once a single element is found the query is short circuited to return the single element. Without knowing this you can get some seemingly odd behaviour and hard to diagnose defects.

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1  
But $('*#exampleID1').hide() works. Just a note. –  poopysprint Jun 18 '12 at 9:53
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why we should not use id selector two times in a page while its working fine

Because you don't know if it's working fine in every browser.

The specifications says that an id has to be unique in the page, so when browsers find your duplicate id:s they will try to handle it as best they can. Most browsers seem to handle it by using the identity only for the first element, but leaving the id attribute on the elements so that your CSS still works, but there is no guarantee that all browsers handle it that way.

Different browser vendors use different tactics for handling incorrect markup, and each vendor finds a "new, better" way, so incorrect markup is typically handled in as many different ways as possible.

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