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I'm trying to upload large files (at least 500MB, preferably up to a few GB) using the WebSocket API. The problem is that I can't figure out how to write "send this slice of the file, release the resources used then repeat". I was hoping I could avoid using something like Flash/Silverlight for this.

Currently, I'm working with something along the lines of:

function FileSlicer(file) {
    // randomly picked 1MB slices,
    // I don't think this size is important for this experiment
    this.sliceSize = 1024*1024;  
    this.slices = Math.ceil(file.size / this.sliceSize);

    this.currentSlice = 0;

    this.getNextSlice = function() {
        var start = this.currentSlice * this.sliceSize;
        var end = Math.min((this.currentSlice+1) * this.sliceSize, file.size);
        ++this.currentSlice;

        return file.slice(start, end);
    }
}

Then, I would upload using:

function Uploader(url, file) {
    var fs = new FileSlicer(file);
    var socket = new WebSocket(url);

    socket.onopen = function() {
        for(var i = 0; i < fs.slices; ++i) {
            socket.send(fs.getNextSlice()); // see below
        }
    }
}

Basically this returns immediately, bufferedAmount is unchanged (0) and it keeps iterating and adding all the slices to the queue before attempting to send it; there's no socket.afterSend to allow me to queue it properly, which is where I'm stuck.

share|improve this question
    
Assuming I don't want to depend on Flash/Silverlight, what should I use? XMLHttpRequest? I was under the impression that WebSockets have less overhead. –  Vlad Ciobanu Jun 18 '12 at 10:40
2  
Websockets have less overhead for bidirectional communication, yes, but uploading a file is simply sending a POST request to a server with the file in the body. Browsers are very good at that and the overhead for a big file is really near nothing. –  dystroy Jun 18 '12 at 10:43
    
I was considering slicing it up in smaller bits. I guess I'll try slicing it using the File API and sending it using XMLHttpRequest, see how that goes. Thank you for your help. If you want to make an answer with the info above, and possibly any other advice I'd happily accept it as the answer. –  Vlad Ciobanu Jun 18 '12 at 10:54
    
just replace xhr call with websocket send you can get large file upload stackoverflow.com/questions/5053290/… –  Konga Raju Apr 8 '13 at 11:12
2  
Yes, but I decided to use simple Ajax calls rather than WebSockets. The implementation is trivial, you just need to queue the next send() on the previous' complete. –  Vlad Ciobanu May 29 '13 at 13:08

5 Answers 5

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Websockets are very efficient for bidirectional communication, especially when you're interested in pushing information (preferably small) from the server. They act as bidirectional sockets (hence their name).

Websockets don't look like the right technology to use in this situation. Especially given that using them adds incompatibilities with some proxies, browsers (IE) or even firewalls.

On the other end, uploading a file is simply sending a POST request to a server with the file in the body. Browsers are very good at that and the overhead for a big file is really near nothing. Don't use websockets for that task.

EDIT : as some people are coming to this old post and most browsers and proxies are now compatible with binary transfert over websocket, I remove some of the precisions that were needed at that time.

share|improve this answer
9  
dystroy, your information is out of date. The standardized WebSocket protocol (IETF 6455) supports sending and receiving direct binary data (ArrayBuffer and Blob). You're thinking of the old Hixie protocol which only support sending UTF-8 data (which required encoding binary data). Also, the IETF 6455 version of the WebSocket protocol was specifically designed to inter-operate with existing proxies and firewalls. I have used WebSockets extensively and do not see the issues you imply. Please cite evidence that there are wide-spread problems. –  kanaka Jun 18 '12 at 17:06
1  
I won't say you're wrong on the IETF 6455 (especially given that searchs about this topic lead to your recent efforts to work on compatibility with this new norm in websockify), and this information is welcome, but the world isn't totally converted. See this proxy problem. Besides, look for "browser support" on this page. And basically there is no reason to use websockets to upload a file. –  dystroy Jun 18 '12 at 17:12
3  
If you remove the entire second paragraph then I have no problem with your answer but the second paragraph is mostly wrong. JSON is just one method of textual serializing/encoding and has nothing directly to do with WebSockets. Base64 is about 33% larger, but it is not CPU heavy (even doing it directly in Javascript). There are certainly buggy intermediaries but there is no widespread problem. The only in-the-wild major browser that still uses Hixie is iOS Safari (and it's possible that iOS 6 will change that). Chrome, Firefox, IE 10, Opera (there but disabled) all use IETF 6455. –  kanaka Jun 18 '12 at 18:05
2  
I never told about CPU. And I know you're a competent promoter of the new version of websockets but it's unfair for OP (who just wants to upload a file) to let think there is now no compatibility problem (I told about proxies, for exemple). –  dystroy Jun 18 '12 at 18:14
2  
dystroy, please don't put words in my mouth. Your answer is fine, but your rationale is flawed. I did not say or imply that WebSockets is the better choice for large file uploads. If you address the issues I'll remove the downvote. Your edit did not improve the situation. And who is "katana"? –  kanaka Jun 18 '12 at 20:15

I believe the send() method is asynchronous which is why it will return immediately. To make it queue, you'd need the server to send a message back to the client after each slice is uploaded; the client can then decide whether it needs to send the next slice or a "upload complete" message back to the server.

This sort of thing would probably be easier using XMLHttpRequest(2); it has callback support built-in and is also more widely supported than the WebSocket API.

share|improve this answer

Use web workers for large files processing instead doing it in main thread and upload chunks of file data using file.slice().

This article helps you to handle large files in workers. change XHR send to Websocket in main thread.

//Messages from worker
function onmessage(blobOrFile) {
 ws.send(blobOrFile);
}

//construct file on server side based on blob or chunk information.
share|improve this answer

You could use http://binaryjs.com/ or https://github.com/liamks/Delivery.js if you can run node.js on the server.

share|improve this answer

In order to serialize this operation you need the server to send you a signal every time a slice is received & written (or an error occurs), this way you could send the next slice in response to the onmessage event, pretty much like this:

function Uploader(url, file) {
    var fs = new FileSlicer(file);
    var socket = new WebSocket(url);

    socket.onopen = function() {
       socket.send(fs.getNextSlice());
    }
    socket.onmessage = function(ms){
        if(ms.data=="ok"){
           fs.slices--;
           if(fs.slices>0) socket.send(fs.getNextSlice());
        }else{
           // handle the error code here.
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You make out FileSlicer to be a standard library, but I can't find it anywhere. I assume that would be something you created yourself? –  CWSpear Mar 7 at 2:33

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