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I want my perl script to be able to do this:

$ ./code file.txt | myperl.pl param1 param2

So basically it will take input (STIDN) from ./code and execute it with param1 and param2.

But why this doesn't work:

my $param1 = $ARGV[0];
my $param2 = $ARGV[1];

while (<>) {
   if ($param1 > 0.5 && $param2 > 0) {
     # do something
  }

}

What's the right construct to do it?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

<> aka readline's default argument is ARGV, which is a magic filehandle that reads from all the files specified in @ARGV, or from STDIN if there are none. Since you are providing arguments, you either need to clear them out of @ARGV before using <>, or explicitly specify <STDIN> and not use the magic ARGV handle.

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This works, it removes the first two params for @ARGV:

my $param1 = shift;
my $param2 = shift;

while (<>) {
   if ($param1 > 0.5 && $param2 > 0) {
     # do something
   }
}

<> (short for <ARGV>) reads from from the files listed in @ARGV if @ARGV isn't empty. When it's empty (such as in the above because you shifted the options out), it reads from STDIN instead.

The alternative would be to use <STDIN> instead of <>, but then the caller loses the option of doing myperl.pl param1 param2 file.txt.

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1  
I prefer this approach, so I added an explanation to complete the answer. –  ikegami Jun 18 '12 at 16:07
    
with ikegami's addition, this answer is better and should be accepted –  ysth Jun 19 '12 at 0:32

You must use <STDIN> in this case.

my $param1 = $ARGV[0];
my $param2 = $ARGV[1];

while (<STDIN>) {
   if ($param1 > 0.5 && $param2 > 0) {
     # do something
  }

}

The diamond-operator <> means arguments + stdin.

When you want use the diamond operator instead of <STDIN>, you must remove these two arguments param1 and param2 from ARGV before. But I think that <STDIN> would be in your case better.

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1  
Actually, <> means arguments || STDIN. ) But it still can be used, if one of the arguments is '-'. –  raina77ow Jun 18 '12 at 10:20
    
@raina77ow: yes, you are right, it would be better to write arguments || stdin –  Igor Chubin Jun 18 '12 at 10:24

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