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can anyone help me for the exercise 12.5 of Jason Hickey's book?

Basically, the question is how to avoid the following conflicting issue due to "include" in practice? Thanks.

# module type XSig = sig 
type t 
val x : t 
end;; 
# module A : XSig = struct 
type t = int 
let x = 0 
end;; 
# module B : XSig = struct 
type t = int 
let x = 1 
end;; 
# module C = struct 
include A 
include B 
end;; 
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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I don't know what the question precisely says, but regarding your code snippet, there are various very different way to interpret what you're trying to do.

What you are currently doing is sealing A and B under two abstract, incompatible signatures, then trying to mix them in a module, only to have a name conflict.

Maybe you just want to avoid the name conflict. The simplest solution, of course, is not to use the same names for both types A.t and B.t. Then you can "not include B":

module C = struct
  include A
  let x_b = B.x
end

The better solution is to use OCaml 3.12 destructive substitution for signatures, with type t := foo, to mask the type t from the module B:

module C = struct
  include A
  type u = B.t (* rename B.t into 'u' to avoid name conflict *)
  include (B : XSig with type t := u)  (* replaces 't' by 'u' *)
end

You may also want the types for modules A and B to be compatible. In this case you must not seal them with abstract types. module type XSig = sig type t val x : t end

module A = struct 
  type t = int 
  let x = 0 
end

(* if you want to check that A can be sealed by XSig, do it here,
   outside the main declaration *)
let _ = (module A : XSig)

module B = struct 
  type t = int 
  let x = 1 
end

module C = struct 
  include (A : XSig with type t := int)
  include (B : XSig with type t := int)
end
(* module C : sig
     val x = int
   end *)

In this example both types A.t and B.t are removed by the destructive subtitution :=. If you want your module C to have a type t, you can write either of:

module C = struct 
  type t = int
  include (A : XSig with type t := t)
  include (B : XSig with type t := t)
end

or, using non-destructive substitution (changes the type definition instead of removing it):

module C = struct 
  include (A : XSig with type t = int)
  include (B : XSig with type t := t)
end

See the manual page for destructive substitution type type t := ... for more details, and the one on the classic with type t = ... construction for comparison.

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