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I have a long data list of values, the years they were recorded in, and their source - among many other columns.
The first ten records look like this:

> data  
$year  
 [1] "1995"  
 [2] "1995"  
 [3] "1995"  
 [4] "1995"  
 [5] "2000"  
 [6] "2000"  
 [7] "2000"  
 [8] "2005"  
 [9] "2005"  
[10] "2005"  
...  
$source  
 [1] "Germany"  
 [2] "France"  
 [3] "Kenya"  
 [4] "Italy"  
 [5] "USA; Germany"  
 [6] "Tanzania"  
 [7] "France; Australia"  
 [8] "Germany"  
 [9] "Germany"  
[10] "Canada"  
...  
$value  
 [1] "1"  
 [2] "1"  
 [3] "3"  
 [4] "1"  
 [5] "5"  
 [6] "13"  
 [7] "2"  
 [8] "4"  
 [9] "9"  
[10] "6"  
...  

I tried to create a machine readable versions of this example:

data <- list(c(1,1995,"Germany"),c(1,1995,"France"),c(3,1995,"Kenya"),c(1,1995,"Italy"),c(5,2000,list(c("USA","Germany"))),c(13,2000,"Tanzania"),c(2,2000,list(c("France","Australia"))),c(4,2005,"Germany"),c(9,2005,"Germany"),c(6,2005,"Canada"))  

This is an alternative version:

data <- list(value=c(1,1,3,1,5,13,2,4,9,6),year=c(1995,1995,1995,1995,2000,2000,2000,2005,2005,2005),source=c("Germany","France","Kenya","Italy",c("USA","Germany"),"Tanzania",c("France","Australia"),"Germany","Germany","Canada"))  

I'm not satisfied with either of them because these structures seem to differ from my data structure. Unfortunately, I don't know how to correct that, though. I hope you still can understand my data despite this shortcoming.
To cut to the chase: First I'd like to aggregate the sources by continent ("Germany", "France", "Italy" = Europe; "Kenya", "Tanzania" = "Africa"; "USA", "Canada" = "North America"; "Australia" = "Australia"; etc.) and then calculate the mean of the values for each year and continent.
In the end I'd like to get an output similar to this:

[1] 1    1995  Europe
[2] 3    1995  Africa
[3] 5    2000  North America
[4] 13   2000  Africa
[5] 2    2000  Australia
[6] 3.5  2000  Europe
[7] 6.5  2005  Europe
[8] 6    2005  North America

I'm not sure how to do this; therefore I'd like to ask you to please help me achieve my desired output!

Thank you very much in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
First read this and follow its directives: stackoverflow.com/questions/5963269/… . Then make your data a data.frame and use ddply in the plyr package. – Ari B. Friedman Jun 18 '12 at 11:26
1  
Of course, to do this you first have to decide what a continent is. You have, for example, an inconsistency in your request where you've specified "USA" and "Canada" as "North America", but as "America" in your desired output.... ;-) – Ananda Mahto Jun 18 '12 at 11:29
    
Don't call new objects the same name as their type... or any type. A search on here for the term aggregate provides several examples to solve your problem once you turn you data into a data.frame object which is just data.frame(myList). – John Jun 18 '12 at 12:02
    
Of course, you're right, @mrdwab. Thank you for pointing it out. In addition to that I did follow the directive as best as I could just like I explained it above. And the search for "[aggregate]", e.g., did not yield any solutions that are helpful to me, unfortunately. – user0815 Jun 18 '12 at 13:05

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