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I have a function that remains pretty much constant except for the changing class names. I was hoping to make the code a little less text heavy. How may I go about making it just a small function instead of repeating it n times. My concern is also about removing the active class for the last li that was clicked. I've provided only 2 instances here, but this code is repeated n number of times.Any ideas would be much appreciated.

        $('a.app1-preview').click(function() {
            //remove last active classes
                    $(".app2").removeClass('active');
                    $(".app2-preview").removeClass('active');
                    //Add active class for this 
            $(this).parent().addClass('active');
            $(this).addClass('active');
            $('.app-preview-2').fadeOut("slow", function () {
                $('.app-preview-1').fadeIn("slow");

            });        
        });

        $('a.app2-preview').click(function() {
            //remove last active classes
                    $(".app1").removeClass('active');
                    $(".app1-preview").removeClass('active');
                    //Add active class for this 
                    $(this).parent().addClass('active');
            $(this).addClass('active');
            $('.app-preview-1').fadeOut("slow", function () {
                $('.app-preview-2').fadeIn("slow");
            });        
        });

HTML code:

 <div class="app-container">
                <ul class="apps">
                  <li class="app1"> 
                      <a title href="#" class="app1-preview blocklink">
                            <span>ANOTHER<br /> APP</span>
                      </a> 
                  </li>
                  <li class="app2"> 
                      <a title href="#" class="app2-preview blocklink">
                            <span>SECOND<br /> APP</span>
                      </a> 
                  </li>
</div>
share|improve this question
    
@Downvoters, why the downvote? this seems perfectly valid.... –  epoch Jun 18 '12 at 11:35
    
Why are your classes so specific ("app1", "app2")? It seems to me you're using them like ids. You can write this in a more generic way without numbering the elements at all given that within your click handler this identifies the click item, and whichever element matches $(".active") must be the previously active one. –  nnnnnn Jun 18 '12 at 11:49
    
Hi All, thanks for the answers. The classes are specific because each uses a different background image and colour. –  user1038814 Jun 18 '12 at 11:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try to exploit the fact that you have .active class. ;) Preview - http://jsfiddle.net/evSqF/1/

js:

<script>
    $('a.blocklink').click(function() {
        var self = $(this);

        $('.active').fadeOut('slow', function(){
            $(this).removeClass('active');

            self.fadeIn('slow');
            self.addClass('active');
        });
    });
</script>

html:

<div class="app-container">
    <ul class="apps">
        <li class="app1">
            <a title href="#" class="app1-preview blocklink">
                <span>ANOTHER<br /> APP</span>
            </a>
            <div class="app-preview active">App1 preview</div>
        </li>
        <li class="app2"> 
            <a title href="#" class="app2-preview blocklink">
                <span>SECOND<br /> APP</span>
            </a>
            <div class="app-preview">App2 preview</div>
        </li>
    </ul>
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Note that with this method you don't need the numbered classes at all. –  nnnnnn Jun 18 '12 at 11:53

Edit: After I got some caffeine, I noticed the problems with the setup. I've created a demo at JSFiddle. The markup will display a "header" for an app which will display the child description when clicked on, and hide the descriptions of other sibling's descriptions.

In this case, you can show the current element, and hide the siblings, which would be a cleaner solution as it scales as you at more app elements.

$(".app").click(function() {
  var $self = $(this);
  var $apps = $self.closest(".apps");
  var $selfSiblings = $apps.children(".app").not($self);

  $self.addClass(".active");
  $self.find(".app-preview").addClass("active");  

  $selfSiblings.removeClass(".active");
    $selfSiblings.find(".app-preview").removeClass("active").fadeOut("slow", function() {
      $self.find(".app-preview").fadeIn("slow");
    });
});​

I would also recommend rewriting your HTML as such:

<div class="app-container">
  <ul class="apps">
    <li class="app"> 
      App 1<br />
      <a title href="#" class="app-preview blocklink">
        <span>PREVIEW 1</span>
      </a> 
    </li>
    <li class="app"> 
      App 2<br />
      <a title href="#" class="app-preview blocklink">
        <span>PREVIEW 2</span>
      </a>
   </li>
      <li class="app"> 
      App 3<br />
      <a title href="#" class="app-preview blocklink">
        <span>PREVIEW 3</span>
      </a>
   </li>
</div>​
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for doing away with the numbered classes and implementing a much more generic function. Not sure that this is what you think it is within the .fadeOut() callback... –  nnnnnn Jun 18 '12 at 11:52
    
@nnnnnn Woops... I wrote this before I got any caffeine. I'll fix it. –  Glenn Nelson Jun 18 '12 at 12:43

Write a function to make the functions for you:

function makeHandler(deactivate, fadeOut, fadeIn) {
  return function() {
        //remove last active classes
        $(deactivate).removeClass('active');

                //Add active class for this 
        $(this).parent().addClass('active');
        $(this).addClass('active');
        $(fadeOut).fadeOut("slow", function () {
            $(fadeIn).fadeIn("slow");

        });        
    });

Then:

$('a.app1-preview').click(makeHandler('.app2, .app2-preview', '.app-preview-2', '.app-preview-1'));
$('a.app2-preview').click(makeHandler('.app1, .app1-preview', '.app-preview-1', '.app-preview-2'));

You could probably simplify things further by re-thinking the naming conventions you've got.

share|improve this answer

I would suggest to define a single function:

function single(index_main, index_aux) {
  // Does all your magic
}

$('a.app1-preview').click(function() {
  single("1", "2");
});

$('a.app2-preview').click(function() {
  single("2", "1");
});

And that does the trick.

share|improve this answer

I made a jsfiddle example for you. Have a look at it here, it uses as much code that you wrote as possible, so nothing that should surprise you will be there :)

http://jsfiddle.net/2ZPxx/

Basically I ended up with this HTML:

<div class="app-container">
    <ul class="apps">
      <li class="app1">
          <a title href="#" class="app1-preview blocklink" id="app1">
                <span>ANOTHER<br /> APP</span>
          </a>
      </li>
      <li class="app2">
          <a title href="#" class="app2-preview blocklink" id="app2">
                <span>SECOND<br /> APP</span>
          </a>
      </li>
</div>
<div class="app-preview-app1 app-preview">App1 preview</div>
<div class="app-preview-app2 app-preview">App2 preview</div>

And this javascript:

$('.apps li a').click(function() {
    var id = $(this).attr('id');
    $('.apps li').removeClass('active');

    //Add active class for this
    $(this).parent().addClass('active');
    $(this).addClass('active');
    $('.app-preview').fadeOut("slow", function () {
        $('.app-preview-'+id).fadeIn("slow");
    });        
});
share|improve this answer

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