Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To be honest, I do not really know how to name that problem. I'll just show the code that is not working:

template<int SIZE>
struct bar{

};

template<int SIZE>
struct foo{
    template<int X>
    void f(bar<X> b);
};

template<int SIZE, int X>
void foo<SIZE>::f(bar<X> b){

}


int main(){
    foo<1> f;
    bar<2> b;
}

I'd like to separate definition from implementation to avoid cyclic dependency issues. Separation is done in header files only, I don't want to put template code into cpp files. Using pointers is no option in that case. Refactoring has been considered but is not a real option, either.

Implementing foo::f without a parameter that has template parameters itself is working fine. I do not really get the problem with that parameter, though.

Code should work using gcc 4.7 and (even more important) Visual Studio 2010. C++11 is ok as long as supported by the platforms mentioned.

Solutions, workarounds as well as theoretical explanations why I'm doing something completly wrong will be highly appreciated. TIA.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
template<int SIZE, int X>    //problem : what is what here?
void foo<SIZE>::f(bar<X> b){

}

It is wrong syntax.

The correct syntax is to use template twice as:

template<int SIZE>   //for the class template
template<int X>      //for the member function template
void foo<SIZE>::f(bar<X> b){

}

Note that the order matters here.

share|improve this answer

This is the right syntax:

template<int SIZE>
template<int X>
void foo<SIZE>::f(bar<X> b){

}

You are otherwise saying that foo is a class template that takes 2 template arguments.

share|improve this answer

There are two levels of templates, and you have to specify them separately

template<int SIZE>
template<int X>
void foo<SIZE>::f(bar<X> b){  }
share|improve this answer

Cyclic dependencies are your main problem. Do you really need them? Try to break your problem in a way where dependencies form a Directed Acyclic Graph and more often than not, you will end up with a better solution.

If you cannot break the cyclic dependencies, then maybe you should reconsider whether the two templates should be in different components (in this case headers), as none of the two seems to be valid without the other.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see any cyclic dependency in the posted code. –  Nawaz Jun 18 '12 at 12:36
    
@Nawaz: I am assuming there is once, due to the line: I'd like to separate definition from implementation to avoid cyclic dependency issues Then again, as House says people lie, so you cannot always trust what the question says –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 18 '12 at 13:05
    
I think because of the compilation error, he incorrectly concluded that it is because of the cyclic dependency issues (which don't even exists). –  Nawaz Jun 18 '12 at 13:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.