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Is there a quick way to get a string containing the sql datatype required for a column declaration, based on column/column information in the database.

For example I'd want strings returned such as:

varchar(200)
datetime
numeric(35,5)

Obviously I can get the information required to generate this myself from SYS.COLUMNS or from INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS and start handling those, but I wanted a (preferably MS provided) way to turn the datatype/maxlength/precision/scale information into the column declaration data type automatically.

I would guess that if there is a standard way to do this it would handle all possible data types, which would be a pain to try to cover manually.

EDIT: Sorry - It seems I've not been clear enough on what I want.

As an example, when you script a table for CREATE in SSMS, the resulting script contains the datatypes in the formats I want. Is there a way to get these automatically?

EDIT:

OK: One more go:

What I want is a bit like this question:

SQL Server: Declaring variable type based on a column type

The difference is that I don't mind having to declare the variable dynamically as I'm working with dynamic SQL already.

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1  
You may check this script (Generate table DDL with t-sql) as reference stormrage.com/SQLStuff/sp_GetDDL_Latest.txt – EricZ Jun 18 '12 at 14:39
    
@EricZ: Is this your own or from somewhere else? - Might turn this into a udf that does single columns. – Jon Egerton Jun 18 '12 at 14:43
    
No, this is not my script. – EricZ Jun 18 '12 at 14:47
    
Do you want user defined data types as well as base types, or just base types? – John Dewey Jun 18 '12 at 15:02
    
@JohnDewey: For what I'm doing base should be enough - the code I've now done deals with Base types. I thought it would be the sort of thing there would be a system udf for! – Jon Egerton Jun 18 '12 at 15:06
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm afraid I don't know of a proper way, but I've had a go at doing the INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Columns way. This is not pretty, but does handle database defaults, nullables, etc.

SELECT column_name + ' ' + DATA_TYPE + COALESCE('(' + CASE
                                                        WHEN DATA_TYPE = 'XML' THEN NULL
                                                        WHEN CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH = -1 THEN 'max'
                                                        ELSE Cast(CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH AS VARCHAR(5))
                                                      END + ')', '(' + Cast(NUMERIC_PRECISION AS NVARCHAR(5)) + ',' + Cast(NUMERIC_SCALE AS NVARCHAR(5)) + ')', '') + ' ' + CASE IS_NULLABLE
                                                                                                                                                                              WHEN 'YES' THEN 'NULL'
                                                                                                                                                                              ELSE 'NOT NULL'
                                                                                                                                                                            END + COALESCE(' DEFAULT' + COLUMN_DEFAULT, '')
FROM   INFORMATION_SCHEMA.Columns
WHERE  table_name = 'mytable'
share|improve this answer
    
This is the sort of thing I've ended up coding. Apparently the closest this in t-sql is OBJECT_DEFINITION, but this doesn't work for tables. There is some stuff about it in MS Connect but it's postponed status. – Jon Egerton Jun 18 '12 at 14:40
    
@JonEgerton I've been after some SQL Server stuff that "just missed" SQL Server 2005 that they still haven't implemented 3 versions later - so I wouldn't hold your breath! Good luck with it, if there's anything that valuely helps in this answer then feel free to use it. – Bridge Jun 18 '12 at 14:44
    
One thing, this describes xml cols as xml(max). – Jon Egerton Jun 18 '12 at 15:29
    
@JonEgerton I didn't have any XML columns in my test db - I guess that's an exception to the rule. I've added a special case for that, it should handle that better now. – Bridge Jun 18 '12 at 15:36

Here's something from my toolbox. Note that it takes the liberty of converting TEXT to VARCHAR(MAX). Opinions may vary but I consider this a feature because I hate TEXT types:)

SELECT REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(CASE ORDINAL_POSITION WHEN 1 THEN '' ELSE ', ' END   +'['+column_name+'] '
    +c.DATA_TYPE
    +ISNULL('('+CAST(c.CHARACTER_MAXIMUM_LENGTH AS VARCHAR(30))+')','')
    +CASE WHEN c.DATA_TYPE IN ('NUMERIC','DECIMAL') THEN
        ISNULL('('+CAST(c.NUMERIC_PRECISION AS VARCHAR(30))+','+CAST(c.NUMERIC_SCALE AS VARCHAR(30))+')','')
        ELSE '' END
    +' ','text(2147483647)','varchar(max)'),'(-1)','(max)')

    -- These last two are optional
    +isnull(CASE WHEN c.IS_NULLABLE='NO' THEN 'NOT ' ELSE NULL END,'')
    +'NULL'
    , 'XML(MAX)','XML')
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS c
WHERE TABLE_NAME='MyTable' and TABLE_SCHEMA='dbo'
ORDER BY ORDINAL_POSITION

EDIT: Replace XML(MAX) results with XML

share|improve this answer
    
One thing to note: it declares xml cols as xml(max) (Was just trying it against some more intereted col types so see how it coped). – Jon Egerton Jun 18 '12 at 15:28
    
Yep, I don't deal with those often, so here's a quick hack to fix.. – John Dewey Jun 18 '12 at 15:39
SELECT
OBJECT_NAME(c.OBJECT_ID) TableName
,c.name AS ColumnName
,t.name AS TypeName
,c.max_length
,c.PRECISION
,c.scale
FROM sys.columns AS c
JOIN sys.types AS t ON c.user_type_id=t.user_type_id
ORDER BY c.OBJECT_ID

I fear that either way (information_schema.columns) or the query above, you'll have to "massage" the return set to generate the correct data type declaration.

share|improve this answer
    
As I said in the question, getting this is easy from sys.columns, and not what I'm interested in. I want the compiled data type as per my examples, so that I can use that to declare other variables/columns. – Jon Egerton Jun 18 '12 at 12:09

what about the second resultset from sp_help? I think you could pretty easily tweak that output to get exactly what you want.

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