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How can I check/detect which Visual Studio version is running under my VSPackage?

I cannot get from the registry because the computer could have several versions installer, so I guess that there is an API that is able to get it.

Anybody knows how to get it from a managed Visual Studio package using C#?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

You could try to get version via automation DTE object. In MPF you could get it in this way:

EnvDTE.DTE dte = (EnvDTE.DTE)Package.GetGlobalService(typeof(EnvDTE.DTE));

There are some other related things to retrieve DTE object - via Project.DTE, also read this thread if you're getting null for DTE.

Then you can get the version by using DTE.Version property.

Also useful information could be found on Carlos Quintero (VS addin ninja) website HOWTO: Detect installed Visual Studio editions, packages or service packs

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Finally I wrote a class to detect the Visual Studio version. Tested and working:

public static class VSVersion
{
    static readonly object mLock = new object();
    static Version mVsVersion;
    static Version mOsVersion;

    public static Version FullVersion
    {
        get
        {
            lock (mLock)
            {
                if (mVsVersion == null)
                {
                    string path = Path.Combine(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, "msenv.dll");

                    if (File.Exists(path))
                    {
                        FileVersionInfo fvi = FileVersionInfo.GetVersionInfo(path);

                        string verName = fvi.ProductVersion;

                        for (int i = 0; i < verName.Length; i++)
                        {
                            if (!char.IsDigit(verName, i) && verName[i] != '.')
                            {
                                verName = verName.Substring(0, i);
                                break;
                            }
                        }
                        mVsVersion = new Version(verName);
                    }
                    else
                        mVsVersion = new Version(0, 0); // Not running inside Visual Studio!
                }
            }

            return mVsVersion;
        }
    }

    public static Version OSVersion
    {
        get { return mOsVersion ?? (mOsVersion = Environment.OSVersion.Version); }
    }

    public static bool VS2012OrLater
    {
        get { return FullVersion >= new Version(11, 0); }
    }

    public static bool VS2010OrLater
    {
        get { return FullVersion >= new Version(10, 0); }
    }

    public static bool VS2008OrOlder
    {
        get { return FullVersion < new Version(9, 0); }
    }

    public static bool VS2005
    {
        get { return FullVersion.Major == 8; }
    }

    public static bool VS2008
    {
        get { return FullVersion.Major == 9; }
    }

    public static bool VS2010
    {
        get { return FullVersion.Major == 10; }
    }

    public static bool VS2012
    {
        get { return FullVersion.Major == 11; }
    }
}
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This solution makes sense compared to DTE.Version, since sooner or later DTE will be deprecated from VS API (the same way VS addin technology got deprecated). The proposed code can be enhanced by using fvi.FileMajorPart and fvi.FileMinorPart that returns two integers, this avoids the string parsing part in the proposed code. –  Patrick from NDepend team Jul 2 at 13:09
    
+1 because this code retrieves the full version (e.g. 11.0.61030.00) that can be used to infer the update-level of VS. DTE.Version only returns e.g. "11.0" –  frank koch Jul 14 at 18:44

I think the following code is better:

string version = ((EnvDTE.DTE) ServiceProvider.GlobalProvider.GetService(typeof(EnvDTE.DTE).GUID)).Version;
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