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I have a Deque that contains this kind of stucts.

struct New_Array {                    
    array<array<int,4>,4> mytable;       
    int h;
};

In this stuct 2 different arrays may have same value of h.

deque<New_Array> Mydeque;

I also know how many different h are in the deque(the value of steps). And how many stucts are in the deque(Mydeque.size()).

I need to print one array for each h. Starting from h=0 till h=steps (steps is a known int value). Each array that is going to be printed must be the closer to the end of the deque.

I tried something like this:

void foo(deque<New_Array> Mydeque, int steps)
 for(int i=0; i<steps; i++)
     {
        deque<New_Array>::iterator it;
        it = find(Mydeque.begin(),Mydeque.end(),i);
        PrintBoard(*it); // This if a function where you enter the New_Array struct 
                         // and it prints the array         
     }
}

The above gives me : error C2679: binary '==' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'const bool' (or there is no acceptable conversion)

Or something like this:

void foo(deque<New_Array> Mydeque, int steps)
for(int i=0; i<steps; i++)
     {
        deque<New_Array>::iterator it;
        for(unsigned int j=0;j<Mydeque.size();j++)
            {
            it = find_if(Mydeque.begin(),Mydeque.end(),Mydeque[j].h==i);
            PrintBoard(*it);
            break;
            }           

     }

The above gives me: error C2064: term does not evaluate to a function taking 1 arguments

EDIT: The deque is not sorted. For each h an array should be printed. This array should be the one that is at this moment closer to the end of the deque.

share|improve this question

Remember the last value and skip:

assert(!Mydeque.empty());
int old_h = Mydeque[0].h + 1; // make sure it's different!

for (std::size_t i = 0, end != Mydeque.size(); i != end; ++i)
{
    if (Mydeque[i].h == old_h) continue;

    print(Mydeque[i]);
    old_h = Mydeque[i].h;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Assuming the deque is not sorted, there is no quicker way than to start from the beginning. – Phil H Jun 18 '12 at 13:00
    
Only works if the deque is sorted, which I see no indication that it is. – Ben Voigt Jun 18 '12 at 13:00
    
Look at my edits – george mano Jun 18 '12 at 13:08
    
@Kerrek If the values of h in the deque is like this: 0, 5 , 2, 1 ,4 , your code will print only the 1st, and 4th element of the Deque. – george mano Jun 18 '12 at 13:19
    
OK, never mind then. I thought the original collection was already sorted. – Kerrek SB Jun 18 '12 at 14:12

Firstly, note that you declare your std::array on the stack, so the storage will also be on the stack. This means that iterating over the structure involves loading a (4*4+1)*int for each comparison. If this is performance-sensitive, I would suggest using std::vector since the load will be only of the outer vector pointer and the h when only comparing h.

struct New_Array {                    
    vector<vector<int,4>,4> mytable;
    int h;
};

Secondly, if you need to access these tables through their h values, or access all the tables with a given h at once, make it easier for everyone and store them as vectors in a map, or a sorted vector of vectors:

std::map<int,std::vector<New_Array> > rolodex;
rolodex[someNewArray.h].push_back(someNewArray);

If you construct this in-order, then the first item in each vector will be the one to print:

for(auto it : rolodex) {
    vector<New_Array> tablesForThisH = it->second;
    if(tablesForThisH.begin() != tablesForThisH.end())
       PrintBoard(it->second[0]);
}

Since std:map stores (and iterates) its keys in ascending (I think) order, this will run over the different h values in ascending order. Again it will only need to load the stack-stored struct, which is just the h int and the vector header (probably 12 bytes, as mentioned in this question).

Forgive me if the code is wrong, my stl is a little rusty.

share|improve this answer

Loop through the deque, and insert all elements into a map, using h as the key. Since your set of h values seems to be sequential, you can use a vector instead, but testing whether an element has already been found will be more difficult.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution is :

void Find_Solution_Path(deque<New_Array> Mydeque, int steps)
{
for(int i=0; i<steps+1; i++)
    {
        for(int j=Mydeque.size()-1;j>-1;j--)
        {
            if (Mydeque[j].h==i)
            {
                PrintBoard(Mydeque[j]);
                cout<<endl;
                break;
            }    
        }    
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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