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I have made my own exception class which derives from runtime_error and is getting an int in the c'tor.

I would like to make a base class for this exception, in order to use polymorphism, so I could catch only the base class and basically I would be catching the derived class, and then call .what() method from it.

So, this is the base class: (ofc in another cpp file I got baseException::~baseException(){})

class baseException
{
    virtual ~baseException()=0 {}
    virtual const char* what()=0;
};

And this is the derived class:

class myException: public runtime_error, public baseException
{
public:
    myException(int): runtime_error("Error occured") {}
    const char* what() {return runtime_error::what();}
};

But when in the main I write:

catch(baseException* x)
{
cout<<x->what();
}

it just skips it and does not enter the block, even though myException inherits from baseException. Any suggests?

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean you can not? – Luchian Grigore Jun 18 '12 at 13:00
    
and where is what() defined? – GazTheDestroyer Jun 18 '12 at 13:01
1  
Why not let baseException inherit from std::runtime_error and myException only from baseException? – Joachim Pileborg Jun 18 '12 at 13:03
    
Also, how do you use throw and catch? Please add that code to the question. – Joachim Pileborg Jun 18 '12 at 13:03
    
@GazTheDestroyer: that's defined by std::runtime_error (assuming that's what the OP means by runtime_error). – Mike Seymour Jun 18 '12 at 13:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your catching a reference to a baseException object; therefor you just know the methods of that class. baseException does not have a member called what() though. This causes the error. Make baseException derive from runtime_error or catch a myException directly.

Edit:

This snippet shows that theres absolutely no reason why pointers shouldnt work together with exceptions:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class A {
public:
    virtual int test() = 0;
};

class B : public A {
public:
    virtual int test() {
        return 42;
    }
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    try {
        throw new std::string("foo");
    } catch (std::string* ecx){
        std::cout << *ecx << std::endl;
    }

    try {
        throw new B();
    } catch (A* ecx) {
        std::cout << ecx->test() << std::endl;
    }
}

Output:

foo

42

share|improve this answer
    
baseException inherits from runtime_error not an option, since each one of my derived custom exceptions sends a different message to runtime_error c'tor. – Jjang Jun 18 '12 at 13:08
    
@Jjang: then pass that message in through the baseException constructor to runtime_error. – rubenvb Jun 18 '12 at 13:08
    
my answer contains an example of doing this – unkulunkulu Jun 18 '12 at 13:09
    
-1 because this answer is wrong. If it didn't have a method it wouldn't even compile. The problem is catching a pointer when it should be a reference. – Jarryd Jun 18 '12 at 14:05
    
@Jarryd At the time i wrote this answere the OP hasnt made his question more concrete. Besides that a quick test shows that its completely legal to throw pointers. Although your code will become exception unsafe. References are a better way due to the RAII pattern. – Paranaix Jun 18 '12 at 14:29

You should catch exceptions by reference (or const reference), not by pointer.

share|improve this answer
1  
This should be a comment. – Luchian Grigore Jun 18 '12 at 13:03
    
why? so how can I do polymorphysem if i catch by reference? – Jjang Jun 18 '12 at 13:09
    
polymorphism is compatible with references, test it out – unkulunkulu Jun 18 '12 at 13:14
    
@LuchianGrigore - why? It addresses exactly the original question. – ecatmur Jun 18 '12 at 13:36
    
So catching by reference fixes the problem? – Luchian Grigore Jun 18 '12 at 13:47

Your baseException doesn't have the what method, you should probably just derive baseException from runtime_error.

class baseException : public runtime_error
{
public:
    baseException(const std::string& what) : runtime_error(what) {}
};

and then

class myException: public baseException
{
public:
    myException(int): baseException("Error occured") {}
};

Although I prefer the following idiom:

class myException: public baseException
{
public:
    myException(int x): baseException(getWhatMessage(x)) {}

private:
    static std::string getWhatMessage(int x) { /*generate the message*/ }
};

On the catch part. If you throw using throw myException(5), then you should catch like this

catch(baseException& x)
{
    cout<<x.what();
}
share|improve this answer
    
but each one of the derived exceptions class has a different message and is getting different objects, some get ints some strings etc – Jjang Jun 18 '12 at 13:11
    
so? add another myException2 taking double as the argument, what's the problem? – unkulunkulu Jun 18 '12 at 13:12

UPDATE: this answer was based on the original version of the question. It now seems that the problem isn't calling what() (as you've worked around that by redeclaring it in your base class). The problem is simply that you're trying to catch a pointer and (I guess) throwing a value; the solution is to catch by reference:

catch (myException const & ex) {
    std::cerr << ex.what() << std::endl;
}

(assuming you fix your declaration of what() to be const; if for some reason you really need it to be non-const, then remove const from the catch line).

ORIGINAL ANSWER describing how to call what() if it isn't declared in baseException:

I want to catch baseException*

You'd be better off catching baseException const &; there's no sensible way to throw a pointer.

and call their .what() methods

If you want to call what() , then you might be better off catching std::exception const & instead; unless you also want some functionality from your base class. In that case, perhaps your base class should inherit from std::runtime_error; or perhaps it should inherit from std::exception, in which case your myException type would need to use virtual inheritance.

If you really want to access what() from your classes as they stand, then you'll need to cross-cast to std::exception:

catch (myException const & ex) {
    std::cerr << dynamic_cast<std::exception const &>(ex).what() << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
    
why go after the begginer into this multiple inheritance madness and not just point the right way to do it? – unkulunkulu Jun 18 '12 at 13:17
    
@unkulunkulu: Because I don't know exactly what the OP is trying to achieve, and so I don't know what the "right" way is. One of the options I gave is to use single inheritance, but I don't know whether that will meet his needs so I also described other options. – Mike Seymour Jun 18 '12 at 13:19

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