Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having difficulties to remember whether in c++ a local (non static, and inside a block) variable defined in the block is destroyed or not as long as a pointer points to it, even after the execution leaves the block. So if I created a int inside a block, and have a global pointer, and I leave the block, can my pointer still find that int?

I didn't finding a clear answer to this online, though it's probably been answered more than once, sorry about that.

share|improve this question
4  
Look up dangling pointer. –  chris Jun 18 '12 at 13:06
    
thanks. got it. –  bob Jun 18 '12 at 13:07
    
for your convenience: stackoverflow.com/questions/5278859/c-dangling-pointer-question –  dwalter Jun 18 '12 at 13:07
    
So just to be clear, the way to get around that, is that you explicity reserve a memory space for that variable, with malloc, right ? How about more complicated variables (objects), is this still applicable ? Is the object destroyed when the execution leaves the block in which it was created ? –  bob Jun 18 '12 at 13:11
    
Yes, but you're using C++ so you should probably use new and delete (unless you're trying to preserve backwards comp. with C). –  MGZero Jun 18 '12 at 13:16
show 1 more comment

1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, you're in undefined behavior territory.

I'm assuming you mean something like:

int* p = NULL;
{
   int x = 0;
   p = &x;
}
//p is a dangling pointer

If you attempt to dereference p after }, you'll run into trouble (or, worse, you won't and it will look like it's working).

You can however re-assign the pointer, so something like

p = new int();

is perfectly OK.

The following would be legal though (as an alternative to allocating dynamic memory with new or malloc):

int* p = NULL;
{
   static int x = 0;
   p = &x;
}
*p = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
So just to be clear, the way to get around that, is that you explicity reserve a memory space for that variable, with malloc, right ? How about more complicated variables (objects), is this still applicable ? Is the object destroyed when the execution leaves the block in which it was created ? –  bob Jun 18 '12 at 13:11
    
@bob yes, it's the same with user-defined types. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 18 '12 at 13:11
2  
@bob: In C++, you typically want to use new instead of malloc. In particular, malloc only allocates memory, but new constructs an object in that memory. With the simple (built-in) types this doesn't matter much, but with more complex types it can become crucial. Although new returns a raw pointer, in most cases you'll want to store it in a smart pointer -- of which there are many varieties (e.g., shared_ptr, unique_ptr). –  Jerry Coffin Jun 18 '12 at 13:12
1  
@bob yes to all 3 questions :) - use new to allocate memory, still applicable for more "complicated" objects, and the object is destroyed when the scope ends. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 18 '12 at 13:13
1  
@bob C++ new returns a pointer in C++, so you can't assign it to an object. It's either list<int>* L = new list<int>() or list<int> L = list<int>() - this last one is redundant, a list<int> L; is enough. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 18 '12 at 13:56
show 6 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.