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I'm using an TCP/IP stack called lwip. I have implemented a function below to send data packets, inspired from a similar callback function that receives data packets.

Each time a packet is received, I create a buffer using the pbuf_alloc function. Then, I send the packet using udp_sendto. Finally, I free the buffer using pbuf_free. (See the code below.)

For some reason, pbuf_free is not freeing the buffer. (I get a buffer overflow after n packets, where n is the pool size.) The lwip wiki warns that:

The network driver may also not assume that the pbuf memory is actually freed when it calls pbuf_free.

How can I force pbuf_free to free my buffer? How is the buffer overflow avoided?

(My implementation below.)

static err_t IAP_tftp_send_data_packet(struct udp_pcb *upcb, struct ip_addr *to, int to_port, int block)
{
  err_t err;
  struct pbuf *pkt_buf;
  char packet[TFTP_DATA_PKT_LEN_MAX];
  int bytesRead;
  int bytesToSend;

  /* Specify that we are sending data. */
  IAP_tftp_set_opcode(packet, TFTP_DATA); 

  /* Specify the block number that we are sending. */
  IAP_tftp_set_block(packet, block);

  bytesRead = IAP_tftp_set_data(packet, block);

  if(bytesRead != 0) {
    bytesToSend = TFTP_DATA_PKT_LEN_MAX - (512 - bytesRead + 1);
  } else {
    bytesToSend = TFTP_DATA_PKT_LEN_MAX - 512;
  }

  pkt_buf = pbuf_alloc(PBUF_TRANSPORT, bytesToSend, PBUF_POOL);

  if (!pkt_buf)
  {
    print("(TFTP) Buffer overflow!\r\n");
  }

  /* Copy the file data onto pkt_buf. */
  memcpy(pkt_buf->payload, packet, bytesToSend);

  err = udp_sendto(upcb, pkt_buf, to, to_port);

  /* free the buffer pbuf */
  printf("%d\n\r", pbuf_free(pkt_buf));

  return err;
}
share|improve this question
    
Did you check the reference count to the buffer? I'm afraid that it is only freed if the reference count is 1. –  Fred Jun 18 '12 at 13:32
    
Possibly udp_sendto takes a reference and releases it asynchronously (in a timer?). Maybe you just need to give it a while? –  ugoren Jun 18 '12 at 13:51
    
@ugoren: I've tried waiting while there is a buffer overflow, but the buffer overflow remains. –  Randomblue Jun 18 '12 at 14:25
1  
What does the printf() statement print when you call pbuf_free() ? –  nos Jul 19 '12 at 22:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+125

What version of lwIP are you using? Depending on different versions the answers vary a lot.

The memp_malloc() allocation function called inside the pbuf_alloc() has failed or the pbufs chaining has failed.So, it returns NULL.

pbuf_alloc() will also return NULL, if the passed arguments also contains NULL.(due to NULL arguments check).

In newer versions, could you show what value the MEMP_OVERFLOW_CHECK macro contains? The lwIP shows a diferent behavior when the macro value >= 2.

And another cause might be if you are using multi-threading, the locking mechanisms inside the pbuf_alloc() fail, might cause it to return NULL.

Some versions require that you call pbuf_init(), before calling pbuf_alloc().

You can try this:

pkt_buf = NULL;//Use NULL, just incase the NULL is not 0 as per your compiler.
pkt_buf = pbuf_alloc(PBUF_TRANSPORT, bytesToSend, PBUF_REF);
if(pkt_buf == NULL)
{
   printf("pbuf_alloc failed.\n");
}
else
{
   /* Do something with the allocated pbufs and free it. */
}

PBUF_REF will allocate no buffer memory for pbuf. The pbuf should be used in a single thread only and if the pbuf gets queued, then pbuf_take should be called to copy the buffer.

You can also try PBUF_RAM which will allocate buffer in RAM.

For more informtaion, you can also browse the source files of the version of lwIP, that you are using.

share|improve this answer
    
Let me know if this answer still didn't answer your question. –  askmish Aug 17 '12 at 6:14
    
I gave you the bounty because your answer is the most promising. I might have to ask you further details as I have time to investigate. Thanks. –  Randomblue Aug 21 '12 at 20:40
    
If you are comfortable and have enough time, I would suggest you to go through the source code of your version, rather than the wiki. The wiki is poorly maintained. –  askmish Aug 24 '12 at 3:42

The easiest solution seems to be to make the buffer static, i.e. re-use the same buffer for each call:

static struct pbuf *pkt_buf = NULL;

if( pkt_buf == NULL )
    pkt_buf = pbuf_alloc(PBUF_TRANSPORT, bytesToSend, PBUF_POOL);
if( pkt_buf == NULL )
{
    print("(TFTP) Buffer overflow!\r\n");
}

If your scenario involves unloading/reloading the driver, it will leak memory. To fix that, make the buffer static outside the IAP_tftp_send_data_packet() function, and call pbuf_free() when the driver unloads (assuming lwip tells you).

share|improve this answer
    
Hum, doesn't work. Good idea, though. –  Randomblue Jun 18 '12 at 14:22

Just a passing thought, possibly completely nonsensical. In this code:

if(bytesRead != 0) {
    bytesToSend = TFTP_DATA_PKT_LEN_MAX - (512 - bytesRead + 1);
} else {
    bytesToSend = TFTP_DATA_PKT_LEN_MAX - 512;
}
pkt_buf = pbuf_alloc(PBUF_TRANSPORT, bytesToSend, PBUF_POOL);

...is it possible for bytesRead to assume the value 513 - TFTP_DATA_PKT_LEN_MAX ?

If it happened, wouldn't the request to allocate zero bytes fail? (this could be tested by printing the value of bytesToSend upon buffer overflow, and checking if it is nonzero).

share|improve this answer

struct pbuf does not represent a continuous region of memory. It is rather a chain of memory locations. Thus this will not work in general case:

memcpy(pkt_buf->payload, packet, bytesToSend);

You need to scatter-copy your data. The memcpy() from the code snippet may overflow the payload buffer and cause all kinds of side effects including inability to free the pbuf chain cleanly.

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