Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've managed to reproduce one of the errors in a test project with a similar structure to my production code. It consists of three simple projects:

Common (class library):

namespace Common
{
    public enum PrimaryColor
    {
        Red,
        Green,
        Blue
    };
}

Library (WCF service library), which has a reference to Common:

using Common;

namespace Library
{
    [ServiceContract]
    public interface ILibrary
    {
        [OperationContract]
        PrimaryColor GetColor();
    }

    public class Library : ILibrary
    {
        public PrimaryColor GetColor()
        {
            return PrimaryColor.Red;
        }
    }
}

ClientApp (console application), which has a reference to Common, and a service reference to Library called "LibraryServiceReference":

using Common;
using ClientApp.LibraryServiceReference;

namespace ClientApp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            LibraryClient client = new LibraryClient("WSHttpBinding_ILibrary");
            PrimaryColor color = client.GetColor();
        }
    }
}

The app.config files in ClientApp and Library are auto-generated and I have not modified them, and I have not changed the default configuration for the LibraryServiceReference in ClientApp.

When I compile this solution, I get the following errors in the ClientApp project:

Error 1

'PrimaryColor' is an ambiguous reference between 'Common.PrimaryColor' and 'ClientApp.LibraryServiceReference.PrimaryColor'

Error 2

Cannot implicitly convert type 'ClientApp.LibraryServiceReference.PrimaryColor' to 'Common.PrimaryColor'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

please help me to fix this.

share|improve this question
1  
Thats a pretty bad accept rate. You should get into the habit of awarding the answer on your questions. –  Tom Redfern Jun 29 '12 at 10:55

5 Answers 5

Make sure that 'Reuse types in all referenced assemblies' is selected in the Advanced options of Add service reference or Configure Service Reference.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
  1. Decorate your enum like this:

    namespace Common
    {
        [DataContract]
        public enum PrimaryColor
        {
            [EnumMember]
            Red,
            [EnumMember]
            Green,
            [EnumMember]
            Blue
        };
    }
    
  2. Update Your service reference (with checking reuse types just like Mark stated).

  3. Rebuild your client code.

share|improve this answer
    
helped me!! I was missing the [EnumMember] attributes and the type which was using this enum was duplicated!! Thanks again!! –  Darxis Dec 8 '12 at 19:12

It sounds like you control both the client and the server code. Why do you want to create a service reference, is there a specific reason or is it just deemed easier?

In projects where you control both sides of the client server application you are better of creating a "contract assembly" (which is probably your common assembly). This contains the interfaces and objects that are involved with the contract and should be referenced by both your client and your server. In order to communicate with the service the client creates a proxy class using the ChannelFactory, there is no need to have a dedicated WCF client.

Example:

ChannelFactory<ISampleService> factory = new ChannelFactory<ISampleService>("Binding_from_config");

ISampleService sampleService = factory.CreateChannel();

sampleService.SomeCall();

factory.Close();

The factory pattern also makes it an ideal candidate for injecting your proxy in via IoC.

The benefits of referencing a common assembly over creating a service reference are:

  • No ambiguous reference as there will be no need for auto generated classes.
  • You will not have to update your service reference every time you change the contract.
share|improve this answer

The problem here is that PrimaryColor exists in both Common and ClientApp.LibraryServiceReference and you are referencing both namespaces in your class.

To overcome this issue, either explicitly reference the instance that you require, i.e.

Common.PrimaryColor color = ....

or set up an alias:

using Service = ClientLibraryServiceReference; ...

Service.PrimaryColor color = ......

share|improve this answer
    
@DavidRead This will leave me with an overhead of writing a conversion method which will convert between Client.PrimaryColor and Service.PrimaryColor back and forth. What if I have 100's of different classes in the service that I need to refer in the Client code?? what do you say? –  Ashish Nov 5 '12 at 14:10
    
I am left with only option to manually edit the refernce.cs file nothing much. Could not figure out the underlying issue in the code. More helping brains needed.. :) –  Ashish Nov 5 '12 at 14:12

When making the service reference aren't there some options that say something like: "inlcude common types in generated service contract" ?

I have the idea that in your service reference the classes are "copied" and that's why you get this error. Inspect the generated service files, remove then and add them again with "Add Service Reference" and see what options you have there.

EDIT

Although I'm almost sure that the Type PrimaryColor is defined twice. One time in the common project and one time in your service reference, you can also try this in your clientApp (to more explicitely specify the PrimaryColor Type):

Common.PrimaryColor color = client.GetColor();
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry It did not help.. :( @youpTube –  Ashish Jun 18 '12 at 17:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.