Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having an issue where if I set the z-index of a parent element that is positioned relatively, then the pseudo element can't be positioned behind it.

Example: http://dabblet.com/gist/2948390

HTML:

<div class="img"><img src="http://lorempixel.com/500/344"></div>

CSS:

.img {
  background:#fff;
  z-index:10;
  position:relative;
  width:500px;
  height:344px;
  border:1px solid black;
  padding:10px;
}

.img:after {
  content:'';
  z-index:0;
  position:absolute;
  bottom:-5px;
  left:10px;
  width:50%;
  height:20%;
  -webkit-box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
  -moz-box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
  box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
}

You can see here, where if I remove the z-index from the parent element and change the z-index on the pseudo element to a negative, then it works.

http://dabblet.com/gist/2948402

Unfortunately, I can't use that method because of how things are being positioned on the rest of the page. I have to be able to set a z-index on the parent element.

Any idea why my first example is functioning like that?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Even elements with negative z-index will always be in front of the border/background of the containing element if the containing element establishes a stacking context. Every item that has a z-index value that isn't auto forms a stacking context:

'z-index'

    Value:   auto | <integer> | inherit
  Initial:   auto 
     [...]

Values have the following meanings:

<integer> This integer is the stack level of the generated box in the current stacking context. The box also establishes a new stacking context.

auto The stack level of the generated box in the current stacking context is 0. The box does not establish a new stacking context unless it is the root element.

[...]

Within each stacking context, the following layers are painted in back-to-front order:

  1. the background and borders of the element forming the stacking context.
  2. the child stacking contexts with negative stack levels (most negative first).
  3. [...]

That's why your second version works, the .img wont create a new stacking context.

See CSS 2.1: 9.9.1 Specifying the stack level: the 'z-index' property) for more information.

Solution

Don't forget that you can create a second pseudo-element, .img:before. Scale it to the maximum, set its z-index to a negative value higher than .img:after and add a background-color. Since it will be rendered on top of .img:after it will create the effect of .img:after being positioned behind .img:

.img {
    background:#fff;
    z-index:10;
    position:relative;
    width:500px;
    height:344px;
    border:1px solid black;
    padding:10px;
}

.img:before{ /* create a pseudo-background */
    z-index:-1;
    position:absolute;
    top:0;
    left:0;
    right:0;
    bottom:0;
    background:#fff;
    content: '';
}

.img:after {
    content:'';
    z-index:-2;  /* lower value than .img:before{z-index} */
    position:absolute;
    bottom:-5px;
    left:10px;
    width:50%;
    height:20%;
    -webkit-box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    -moz-box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
    box-shadow:0 15px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.7);
}

dabblet demo

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Answers don't get much more solid than this. –  Jezen Thomas Jun 18 '12 at 15:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.