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On github, I forked an old version of another project. I made some changes and am trying to push them onto my fork on github. I commited the changes locally, then tried git push, but this simply tells me "Everything up-to-date". When I browse the project on github, however, nothing has changed: it still shows the files (from the latest version) on my fork, unmodified. How can I push the changes to my github account?

(I realize this isn't much information...what else can I say? I have a feeling that it may be because I'm modifying the files directly in (home)/git/(project)...?)

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Check if your are on correct branch. git log --graph --all --decorate --pretty=oneline and git remote show origin may be useful –  tomgi Jun 18 '12 at 14:11
    
What is the output of git branch -v and git remote -v? –  Stefan Jun 18 '12 at 14:13
    
Everything up-to-date means nothing has been pushed (because nothing has been added), did you git add and git commit before your git push? –  KurzedMetal Jun 18 '12 at 14:24
    
Ahh, git branch -v indicates that my commit was on (no branch). As for the add, I initially commited the changes through Eclipse (with the git plugin)...when I do git add from the command line, it doesn't seem to do anything. –  Kelsey Rider Jun 18 '12 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

git branch -v indicates that my commit was on (no branch). As for the add, I initially commited the changes through Eclipse (with the git plugin)...when I do git add from the command line, it doesn't seem to do anything

That means you are in a DETACHED HEAD mode.
You can add and commit, but from the upstream repo point of view (ie from the GitHub repo), no new commits are ready to be pushed.
You have various ways to include your local (detached HEAD) commit back into a branch, which you will be able to push then.
See:

The OP mentions this article in order to fix the situation:
"git: what to do if you commit to no branch"

all we need to do is checkout the branch we should have been on and merge in that commit SHA:

Note that instead of merging the SHA1 that you would have somehow copied, you can memorize it with a script, using head=$(git rev-parse HEAD):
See "git: reliably switching to a detached HEAD and then restore HEAD later, all from a script".
Then you can merge that detached HEAD back to the right branch.

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Yep, this is what I just figured out. This showed me how to fix it. –  Kelsey Rider Jun 18 '12 at 15:00
    
@KelseyRider I have added a reference to a script which would memorizing the detached HEAD SHA1 for you. –  VonC Jun 18 '12 at 15:11

After you change files, you need to

git add

them prior to

git commit

.

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He said he commited the changes locally –  tomgi Jun 18 '12 at 14:28
    
Thank you Themroc! After git add and git commit and a git push origin it worked. –  Marin Mar 16 at 16:58
git commit 

Will show you what files are on your local machine, uncomment what you want to upload and

git push origin master

Because git add * did not work for me (even if it didn't returned errors).

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