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I'm using Sass (.scss) for my current project.

Following example:

html

<div class="container desc">
    <div class="hello>
        Hello World
    </div>
</div>

scss

.container {
    background:red;
    color:white;

    .hello {
        padding-left:50px;
    }
}

This works great.

Can I handle multiple classes while using nested styles.

In the sample above I'm talking about this:

normal css

.container.desc {
    background:blue;
}

In this case all div.container would normally be red but div.container.desc would be blue.

How can I nest this inside container with Sass?

Any ideas on that? Is that even possible?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 67 down vote accepted

You can use &, it will be replaced by the parent selector after compilation:

For your example:

.container {
    background:red;
    &.desc{
       background:blue;
    }
}

/* compiles to: */
.container {
    background: red;
}
.container.desc {
    background: blue;
}

See the Docs at Section Parent References.
The & will completely resolve, so if your parent selector is nested itself, the nesting will be resolved before replacing the &.
Note that you can place the & at virtually any position you like*, so the following is possible too:

.container {
    background:red;
    #id &{
       background:blue;
    }
}

/* compiles to: */
.container {
    background: red;
}
#id .container {
    background: blue;
}

However be aware, that this somehow breaks your nesting structure and thus may increase the effort of finding a specific rule in your stylesheet.

*: No other characters than whitespaces are allowed in front of the &. So you cannot do a direct concatenation of selector+& - #id& would throw an error.

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