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I'm using Sass (.scss) for my current project.

Following example:

HTML

<div class="container desc">
    <div class="hello>
        Hello World
    </div>
</div>

SCSS

.container {
    background:red;
    color:white;

    .hello {
        padding-left:50px;
    }
}

This works great.

Can I handle multiple classes while using nested styles.

In the sample above I'm talking about this:

CSS

.container.desc {
    background:blue;
}

In this case all div.container would normally be red but div.container.desc would be blue.

How can I nest this inside container with Sass?

share|improve this question
    
    
@Christoph Why are you adding irrelevant tags? This is not a CSS problem. – cimmanon Sep 2 '15 at 22:20
    
It was part of the original (i think not so irrelevant) tags included by the OP which you removed. – Christoph Sep 2 '15 at 22:28
up vote 221 down vote accepted

You can use the parent selector reference &, it will be replaced by the parent selector after compilation:

For your example:

.container {
    background:red;
    &.desc{
       background:blue;
    }
}

/* compiles to: */
.container {
    background: red;
}
.container.desc {
    background: blue;
}

The & will completely resolve, so if your parent selector is nested itself, the nesting will be resolved before replacing the &.

This notation is most often used to write pseudo-elements and -classes:

.element{
    &:hover{ ... }
    &:nth-child(1){ ... }
}

However, you can place the & at virtually any position you like*, so the following is possible too:

.container {
    background:red;
    #id &{
       background:blue;
    }
}

/* compiles to: */
.container {
    background: red;
}
#id .container {
    background: blue;
}

However be aware, that this somehow breaks your nesting structure and thus may increase the effort of finding a specific rule in your stylesheet.

*: No other characters than whitespaces are allowed in front of the &. So you cannot do a direct concatenation of selector+& - #id& would throw an error.

share|improve this answer
5  
Just a side note, a common use of & is when using pseudo-elements and pseudo-classes. For example: &:hover. – crush Dec 1 '14 at 18:30
    
@crush For completeness' sake I added this to my answer. Thank you for the comment. – Christoph Dec 1 '14 at 22:34
1  
Thanks. I thought I was being stupid as it isn't mentioned in the basics guide! BTW the docs has moved URL to: sass-lang.com/documentation/… – scipilot Aug 1 '15 at 6:51

Yes ofcourse. But avoiding cascading selector and deep nesting is the best practice. Reduce nesting CSS selectors to maximum 3 level nesting. It is better to have more plain structure of a module and avoid long selectors rather than mimic nesting of DOM elements in CSS.

For More check here

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