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I need to work with already existing database schema, with data in it. Is it possible to fetch the data from given SQLite file to iOS database to work with Core Data and models I am going to create? If not, what would be your suggestions? I really need to transfer that data in existing from to device database, so I can use it with my app.

Thanks.

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I would recommend not using Core Data for this if you don't know the structure of the database beforehand. Apple designed Core Data so that you set up the data structure beforehand. You then use that structure in your application. But taking an arbitrary SQLite table structure and trying to adapt it to a preset Core Data structure is going to be difficult at best. I won't say it's impossible, but with the level of abstraction you'd have to do to make it work it'll be much more feasible for you to simply use SQLite. I recommend adding some kind of database wrapper like FMDB to access the data using Objective-C (as opposed to C functions). This way you don't need to adapt an SQLite file, but instead use the file directly (or import it into an existing SQLite file).

If you do know the structure beforehand, then yes, it should be fairly easy to import data from SQLite into core data. You will first need to recreate that structure in Core Data using Apple's tools. During runtime you can grab the information from the SQLite database and add it to Core Data. If you haven't done so, read Apple's Core Data Programming Guide to understand the Core Data side of the equation. I still recommend FMDB for accessing the SQLite database as it will make getting the data from SQLite a lot easier.

I'd also like to point out that if the SQLite database changes (or might change) you might still be better served by avoiding Core Data, depending on how often it changes. The reason for this is simple: In order for Core Data to adapt to the change in the SQLite database you have to make the changes and then issue an update to your app. This could provide many days (perhaps weeks) where your app won't fully sync to the SQLite database or may even cause errors. Core Data is great for a lot of things, but adapting data structures is not one of them.

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But, how different would be, using existing structure by making managed objects? I just can't see why would it be so difficult. Could you explain what would be so hard about it? As all I want to do is create model corresponding to an existing one, and pre load it with data I already have. –  foFox Jun 18 '12 at 15:08
    
Do you know beforehand the structure of the database you're looking import? –  Aaron Hayman Jun 18 '12 at 15:17
    
Yes I do know the structure of the database. It an exiting structure, all I need to do is to represent the exact same structure on iOS database. In addition, I have data already, so after I create that model, I would like to "pre-populate" database with the records I possess. Again, I can create models to be managed by CoreData before I try to pre populate the database, as I know their structure. –  foFox Jun 18 '12 at 15:20
    
Ah, I'm sorry, I misunderstood your question. I thought you didn't know the structure beforehand and was trying to recreate that structure in Core Data at runtime. I'll modify my answer. –  Aaron Hayman Jun 18 '12 at 15:22
    
Maybe my phrasing wasn't too good either. –  foFox Jun 18 '12 at 15:24
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I'm having a little trouble understanding the question, but I think it's this:

How do I use CoreData on a sqlite .db that was created outside of CoreData?

If that's your question, here's a couple links

http://ablogontech.wordpress.com/2009/07/13/using-a-pre-populated-sqlite-database-with-core-data-on-iphone-os-3-0/

http://www.raywenderlich.com/980/core-data-tutorial-how-to-preloadimport-existing-data

But, like the other answer, Apple recommends against this

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