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I know that vector elements destruction order is not defined by C++ standard (see Order of destruction of elements of an std::vector) and I saw that all compilers I checked do this destruction from begin to end - which is quite surprising to me since dynamic and static arrays do it in reverse order, and this reverse order is quite often in C++ world.

To be strict: I know that "Container members ... can be constructed and destroyed in any order using for example insert and erase member functions" and I do not vote for "containers to keep some kind of log over these changes". I would just vote for changing current vector destructor implementation from forward destruction to backward destruction of elements - nothing more. And maybe add this rule to C++ standard.

And the reason why? The changing from arrays to vector would be safer this way.

REAL WORLD EXAMPLE: We all know that mutexes locking and unlocking order is very important. And to ensure that unlocking happens - ScopeGuard pattern is used. Then destruction order is important. Consider this example. There - switching from arrays to vector causes deadlock - just because their destruction order differs:

class mutex {
public:
    void lock() { cout << (void*)this << "->lock()\n"; }
    void unlock() { cout << (void*)this << "->unlock()\n"; }
};

class lock {
    lock(const mutex&);
public:
    lock(mutex& m) : m_(&m) { m_->lock(); }
    lock(lock&& o) { m_ = o.m_; o.m_ = 0; }
    lock& operator = (lock&& o) { 
        if (&o != this) {
            m_ = o.m_; o.m_ = 0;
        }
        return *this;
    }
    ~lock() { if (m_) m_->unlock(); }  
private:
    mutex* m_;
};

mutex m1, m2, m3, m4, m5, m6;

void f1() {
    cout << "f1() begin!\n";
    lock ll[] = { m1, m2, m3, m4, m5 };
    cout <<; "f1() end!\n";
}

void f2() {
    cout << "f2() begin!\n";
    vector<lock> ll;
    ll.reserve(6); // note memory is reserved - no re-assigned expected!!
    ll.push_back(m1);
    ll.push_back(m2);
    ll.push_back(m3);
    ll.push_back(m4);
    ll.push_back(m5);
    cout << "f2() end!\n";
}

int main() {
    f1();
    f2();
}

OUTPUT - see the destruction order change from f1() to f2()

f1() begin!
0x804a854->lock()
0x804a855->lock()
0x804a856->lock()
0x804a857->lock()
0x804a858->lock()
f1() end!
0x804a858->unlock()
0x804a857->unlock()
0x804a856->unlock()
0x804a855->unlock()
0x804a854->unlock()
f2() begin!
0x804a854->lock()
0x804a855->lock()
0x804a856->lock()
0x804a857->lock()
0x804a858->lock()
f2() end!
0x804a854->unlock()
0x804a855->unlock()
0x804a856->unlock()
0x804a857->unlock()
0x804a858->unlock()

Thanks, Piotr Nycz

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1  
IMHO the destruction order should not matter if the software is well designed. When a destructor is called, this means the objects are no longer in use or required. You should make sure your objects are in a consistent state (in this case not used anymore) before destroying them. –  m0skit0 Jun 18 '12 at 14:43
    
We also all know that when order of executing is that important, that it is not a good idea to put them in any container and let generated code destroy. // sarcasm notice: I'm a bit suspicious with "we all know" statements –  stefaanv Jun 18 '12 at 14:53
    
Probably you answered without reading. n ScopeGuard (stackoverflow.com/questions/48647/…) I used here, the destruction order matters. That's why I used this example. –  PiotrNycz Jun 18 '12 at 14:55
    
@user1463922: I know RAII and scopeguards. I just mean that when order matters, you should destroy the entries yourself, by popping them from the container. –  stefaanv Jun 18 '12 at 15:32
    
stefaanv: I did not answer to your comment. Frankly I answered to m0skit0 and you are were quick enough to take the place between us. BTW, you mean popping in new vector specialization destructor... I thought about resize(0) I've heard somewhere that resize() shrinks in reverse order and standard tells that. –  PiotrNycz Jun 18 '12 at 16:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think this is another case of C++ giving compiler writers the flexibility to write the most performant containers for their architecture. Requiring destruction in a particular order could hurt performance for a convenience in something like 0.001% of cases (I've actually never seen another example where the default order wasn't suitable). In this case since vector is contiguous data I'm referring to the hardware's ability to utilize look-ahead caching intelligently instead of iterating backwards and probably repeatedly missing the cache.

If a particular order of destruction is required for your container instance, the language asks that you implement it yourself to avoid potentially penalizing other clients of the standard features.

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Thanks for this answer. I really thought that there is no PERFORMANCE difference between forward and backward destruction. –  PiotrNycz Jun 18 '12 at 15:33
    
Mark - so according to your answer - C++ rule to calls destructors in reverse orders in arrays and member variables - causes that this destruction is not such efficient as this in forward order? –  PiotrNycz Jun 18 '12 at 16:15
    
@user1463922 There could possibly be performance implications, correct. Certainly for member variables however it's desirable to have a fixed order of construction/destruction. For containers it's a different case and choice. –  Mark B Jun 18 '12 at 16:25

No, it is not a reasonable change because most people will not use the feature. That would go against the "you don't pay for what up don't use" principle of C++.

If you specifically need to destroy the container members in the reverse order, the standard library already happens to offer another container that can be used for that. Replace the std::vector with a std::deque and use push_front to add the members. That way, the last member added will be destroyed first.

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Wow, are you saying that destruction order of std::deque is defined in C++ standard. If not then I do not need noportable solution. If yes - could you please cite the standard? –  PiotrNycz Jun 18 '12 at 19:37
    
You just figured out that all known implementations will destroy vector members from begin() to end(). Now go look at the deque implementations! If that's not good enough, you have to write your own. –  Bo Persson Jun 18 '12 at 19:47
    
@PiotrNycz In no circumstances do you need a non-portable solution. You just have to destroy the objects in the correct order manually. –  Mark B Jun 18 '12 at 20:36

Fwiw, libc++ outputs:

f1() begin!
0x1063e1168->lock()
0x1063e1169->lock()
0x1063e116a->lock()
0x1063e116b->lock()
0x1063e116c->lock()
f1() end!
0x1063e116c->unlock()
0x1063e116b->unlock()
0x1063e116a->unlock()
0x1063e1169->unlock()
0x1063e1168->unlock()
f2() begin!
0x1063e1168->lock()
0x1063e1169->lock()
0x1063e116a->lock()
0x1063e116b->lock()
0x1063e116c->lock()
f2() end!
0x1063e116c->unlock()
0x1063e116b->unlock()
0x1063e116a->unlock()
0x1063e1169->unlock()
0x1063e1168->unlock()

It was purposefully implemented this way. The key function defined here is:

template <class _Tp, class _Allocator>
_LIBCPP_INLINE_VISIBILITY inline
void
__vector_base<_Tp, _Allocator>::__destruct_at_end(const_pointer __new_last, false_type) _NOEXCEPT
{
    while (__new_last != __end_)
        __alloc_traits::destroy(__alloc(), const_cast<pointer>(--__end_));
}

This private implementation-detail is called whenever the size() needs to shrink.

I have not yet received any feedback on this visible implementation detail, either positive or negative.

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It nice to know that there exists such implementation. –  PiotrNycz Jun 19 '12 at 21:00
    
what do you think about rationale given by Mark for forward destruction: to use "hardware's ability to utilize look-ahead caching intelligently instead of iterating backwards and probably repeatedly missing the cache." libc++ claims to be good in performance... –  PiotrNycz Jun 19 '12 at 21:13
    
This is a possibility. But I have not noticed such a difference. Nor have I looked for it. Nor have any of my customers complained of a performance problem in this area (I have gotten performance complaints in other areas - some already addressed, some still on my to-do list). –  Howard Hinnant Jun 19 '12 at 22:32

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