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Using Boost.Python, I can't seem to be able to bind any function that returns a const char* example:

class Bar
{
 private:
   int x;
 public:
   Bar():x(0){}
   Bar(int x) : x(x) {}
   int get_x() const { return x; }
   void set_x(int x) { this->x = x; }
   const char *get_str(){return "hello";}
};

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(internal_refs)
{
   class_<Bar>("Bar")
      .def("get_x", &Bar::get_x)
      .def("set_x", &Bar::set_x)
      .def("get_str", &Bar::get_str, return_internal_reference<>())
      ;
}

I get the following error:

/usr/local/include/boost/python/object/make_instance.hpp:27:9: error: no matching function for call to ‘assertion_failed(mpl_::failed************ boost::mpl::or_<boost::is_class<char>, boost::is_union<char>, mpl_::bool_<false>, mpl_::bool_<false>, mpl_::bool_<false> >::************)’
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

With boost 1.50, I am able to return const char* without needing to specify a CallPolicy. The compile error you are receiving is a static assert, indicating that return_internal_reference is designed to be used for types that are either a class or union. In this case, it is neither of those.

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(internal_refs)
{
   class_<Bar>("Bar")
      .def("get_x",   &Bar::get_x)
      .def("set_x",   &Bar::set_x)
      .def("get_str", &Bar::get_str)
      ;
}
python
>>> from internal_refs import Bar
>>> b = Bar()
>>> b.get_str()
'hello'
>>> type(b.get_str())
<type 'str'>
share|improve this answer
    
yup that works, so I don't need a return policy for const char * ? but how will boost know not to free that ? I mean is it safe ? I've reading about return policies but I'm still not quite sure when use each one ? –  mux Jun 21 '12 at 18:49
1  
It should be safe. boost::python is handling the lower level details for types that it knows will be immutable. In this case, it will allocate a Py_String object, populate it, then allow Python to manage it. Here is an explanation that may provide some insight into why return_internal_reference requires class or union types. –  Tanner Sansbury Jun 21 '12 at 18:56
    
Thanks, I will award your answer the bounty, but it says I must wait 21 hours, will do so tomorrow, thanks again for your help. –  mux Jun 21 '12 at 19:06

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