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how can i get gps without alert view (jailbroken iphone) ?

NSString *newText;

CLLocationManager * locationManager = [[CLLocationManager alloc] init];
[locationManager startUpdatingLocation];
[locationManager setDesiredAccuracy:kCLLocationAccuracyNearestTenMeters];

CLLocation* location = [locationManager location];
CLLocationCoordinate2D coordinate = [location coordinate];

newText = [[NSString alloc] initWithFormat: @"Your Position : %f %f", coordinate.latitude, coordinate.longitude];

NSLog(@"%@", newText);
share|improve this question
    
Sounds like you're trying to write a program that grabs a user's location without their permission... – C0deH4cker Jun 24 '12 at 4:33
up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50
[CLLocationManager setAuthorizationStatus:YES forBundleIdentifier:@"your app bundle identifier"];

To use this your application entitlements should have com.apple.locationd.authorizeapplications key with boolean value set to true.

UPDATE

Found much better solution. Add to your application entitlements com.apple.locationd.preauthorized key with boolean value set to true. This will preauthorize your application so you could request location without any user permission or private APIs. I tested it on iPhone 4S, 5, 5C, 5S with iOS 5-7. It works in daemons or command line tools without any Info.plist, just plain binary.

For the test I used the following code

#import <CoreLocation/CoreLocation.h>

@interface LocationDelegate : NSObject<CLLocationManagerDelegate>
@end

@implementation

-(void)locationManager:(CLLocationManager*)manager didUpdateLocations:(NSArray*)locations
{
    NSLog(@"%@", locations);
}

@end

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    LocationDelegate* delegate = [[LocationDelegate alloc] init];

    CLLocationManager* manager = [[CLLocationManager alloc] init];
    manager.delegate = delegate;
    [manager startUpdatingLocation];

    [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] run];

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
... rembering, of course, to locally declare + (void) setAuthorizationStatus: (BOOL)status forBundleIdentifier: (NSString*)id;, since that's private API. – Nate May 21 '13 at 4:21
    
But you don't have to if you don't mind compiler warnings. – creker May 21 '13 at 9:51
    
Well, with the default settings you now get with Xcode / CLang / ARC, it's no longer a warning. It's an error, and your project won't build. Even if you are using older tools/settings for your project, it's never a good idea to ignore warnings. It makes it harder to catch other legitimate problems that the compiler finds for you. – Nate May 21 '13 at 20:53
1  
Instead of "your app bundle identifier" you should put actual bundle ID of your app. Then just check whether you get coordinates, don't look at the status. – creker Aug 22 '13 at 19:54
1  
It doesn't matter. My apps also just daemons without any GUI. I'm building them with Xcode so I have a valid Info.plist file with bundle ID. This is the bundle ID that I pass to mentioned function. Works perfectly on iOS 5 and 6. – creker Aug 23 '13 at 17:00

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