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I have a stored procedure that basically updates the LASTUPDATE times of some rows and I want to have a variable inside the stored procedure that is basically: Date + " " + "20:30:00" So when the stored procedure is run it looks something like this:

update 
    person 
set 
    LASTUPDATETIME='2012-06-18 20:30:00', 
    NAME='Mike', 
where (
    SOME_PK='123'
);

but if I was to run the stored procedure tomorrow it would look like so:

update 
    person 
set 
    LASTUPDATETIME='2012-06-19 20:30:00', 
    NAME='Mike', 
where (
    SOME_PK='123'
);

P.S The time never changes, it should always be 20:30:00 no matter when the procedure is called, I’m just interested in the date with the format Year-Month-day.

Thanks for any help!

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the VARCHAR_FORMAT() function to get the current date as a string, and then append your hard coded time to it:

SELECT VARCHAR_FORMAT(CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, 'YYYY-MM-DD') || ' 20:30:00'
FROM SYSIBM.SYSDUMMY1

If you want to store the result as a TIMESTAMP data type, you can use the TIMESTAMP function:

SELECT TIMESTAMP(CURRENT_DATE, '20:30:00')
FROM SYSIBM.SYSDUMMY1

Tested on DB2 for Linux/Unix/Windows, and z/OS.

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Thank you for the answer, I tried it and it works. Just to confirm on how I would store it and use it as a variable, would the following work: DECLARE date_time varchar(4000); SELECT VARCHAR_FORMAT(CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, 'YYYY-MM-DD') || ' 20:30:00' INTO date_time FROM SYSIBM.SYSDUMMY1; update person set LASTUPDATETIME=date_time, NAME='Mike', where ( SOME_PK='123' ); update person set LASTUPDATETIME=date_time, NAME='Mo', where ( SOME_PK='124' ); –  Mo. Jun 18 '12 at 18:29
    
I believe so, yes. Although, I would personally convert it back to and store it as a TIMESTAMP type, it would make date-related operations so much easier. However, you might not be able to do that if you're working with a legacy schema. –  bhamby Jun 18 '12 at 20:26
    
Given that TIMESTAMP() has a two-parameter version (one for date, the other for time, or their string representations), the call to VARCHAR_FORMAT() probably isn't necessary. –  Clockwork-Muse Jun 19 '12 at 16:27
    
@X-Zero: Hey, you're right! I updated the answer. I think the VARCHAR_FORMAT is still necessary for the string version, though. –  bhamby Jun 19 '12 at 16:33
    
Probably, but I'd actually start with it as a timestamp, and wrap that in any formatting conversion - especially as that would allow you to be more 'flexible' (although storage should, of course, be in the actual type). –  Clockwork-Muse Jun 19 '12 at 18:06
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