Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I find that I'm repeating myself alot and that is of course no good. So I wondered if I could do something about it. This is a common code in my WPF application:

private string _name;
public string Name
{
    get { return _name; }
    set
    {
        if (_name != value)
        {
            _name = value;
            OnPropertyChanged("Name");
        }
    }
}

So I was wondering if I could wrap the setter somehow to make it better and more readable. One idea was something like this:

protected void PropertySetter<T>(T property, T value, string name)
{
    if (EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(property, value))
    {
        property = value;
        OnPropertyChanged(name);
    }
}

Usage like this:

private string _name2;
public string Name2
{
    get { return _name2; }
    set
    {
        PropertySetter<string>(Name2, value, "Name2");
    }
}

But I'm not sure this is really smart or would work as well with Value types?

I guess I'm not the first one to try something like this so if someone knows a good foolproof way to something like this please chime in. I guess I couldn't make the propertyChanged typesafe without reflection but any ideas there would also help.

share|improve this question
2  
Check ReactiveUI for this behaviour, if you don't want to use it then you might be able to copy it. reactiveui.net e.g. set { this.RaiseAndSetIfChanged(x => x.PasswordConfirmation, value); } –  Sebastian Piu Jun 18 '12 at 15:58
1  
Add ref to your property parameter and it will work for ValueTypes as well. –  Yorye Nathan Jun 18 '12 at 16:02
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes - this is completely acceptable and normal code.

Here's an example I found that's pretty standardized (I see a lot of this type of usage in code samples).

public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

private void SetProperty<T>(ref T field, T value, string name)
{
    if (!EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(field, value))
    {
        field = value;
        var handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null)
        {
          handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }
}

Wrap this code inside of a class that implements INotifyPropertyChanged, and inherit your data objects from this class.

In your example, you are calling the event directly - never do this. You could lose the event reference from the time the method starts to the time you call the event. Always create a local cache of the event before invoking it.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes my OnPropertyChanged methods wraps the creating of a local copy handler. Thank you, missed the ref keyword. –  Ingó Vals Jun 18 '12 at 16:15
add comment

Maybe this could help you

public class ObservableObject : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    #region Events
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    #endregion

    #region Protected Methods
    protected virtual void SetAndNotify<T>(ref T field, T value, Expression<Func<T>> property)
    {
        if (!object.ReferenceEquals(field, value))
        {
            field = value;
            this.OnPropertyChanged(property);
        }
    }

    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged<T>(Expression<Func<T>> changedProperty)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            string name = ((MemberExpression)changedProperty.Body).Member.Name;
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

Usage:

private String _myField;
    public String MyProperty
    {
        get
        { return _myField; }
        set
        { SetAndNotify(ref _myField, value, () => MyProperty); }
    }

Edit: Your class must inherit from this OservableObject class

share|improve this answer
1  
Never call PropertyChanged directly - there are race conditions that will cause this to fail. Instead, always create a local copy and invoke that instead. –  SpikeX Jun 18 '12 at 16:05
    
Does the memberExpression reflection thing have any drawbacks, performancewise for example or situation they don't work? –  Ingó Vals Jun 18 '12 at 16:16
    
@IngóVals I have implemented this class in two projects I have developed and there has been no problem so far –  Dante Jun 18 '12 at 16:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.