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I'm working in OpenGL, with VBOs, and I have a set of three lines (along the X, Y and Z axes - think Czech hedgehog). The lines are grey by default, but I want them bright red so I can see them better. Unfortunately, though I added color information as vertex data, the lines still appear grey. I'm probably missing something basic, but I can't see it. Here is how I create the VBO:

//Position data
sf::Vector3<float> Top    = sf::Vector3<float>(0.0, 1.0, 0.0);
sf::Vector3<float> Front  = sf::Vector3<float>(0.0, 0.0, -1.0);
sf::Vector3<float> Right  = sf::Vector3<float>(1.0, 0.0, 0.0);
sf::Vector3<float> Back   = sf::Vector3<float>(0.0, 0.0, 1.0);
sf::Vector3<float> Left   = sf::Vector3<float>(-1.0, 0.0, 0.0);
sf::Vector3<float> Bottom = sf::Vector3<float>(0.0, -1.0, 0.0);

//Color data
//Just to be clear, I also tried with 255.0, although I'm rather certain OpenGL 
//does its colors on a 0-1 scale.
sf::Vector3<float> Color = sf::Vector3<float>(1.0, 0.0, 0.0);

//Create vector
std::vector<float> LineArray;

//Top
LineArray.push_back(Top.x);
LineArray.push_back(Top.y);
LineArray.push_back(Top.z);
LineArray.push_back(Color.x);
LineArray.push_back(Color.y);
LineArray.push_back(Color.z);
//Bottom
LineArray.push_back(Bottom.x);
LineArray.push_back(Bottom.y);
LineArray.push_back(Bottom.z);
LineArray.push_back(Color.x);
LineArray.push_back(Color.y);
LineArray.push_back(Color.z);

//Front
LineArray.push_back(Front.x);
LineArray.push_back(Front.y);
LineArray.push_back(Front.z);
LineArray.push_back(Color.x);
LineArray.push_back(Color.y);
LineArray.push_back(Color.z);
//Back
LineArray.push_back(Back.x);
LineArray.push_back(Back.y);
LineArray.push_back(Back.z);
LineArray.push_back(Color.x);
LineArray.push_back(Color.y);
LineArray.push_back(Color.z);

//Right
LineArray.push_back(Right.x);
LineArray.push_back(Right.y);
LineArray.push_back(Right.z);
LineArray.push_back(Color.x);
LineArray.push_back(Color.y);
LineArray.push_back(Color.z);
//Left
LineArray.push_back(Left.x);
LineArray.push_back(Left.y);
LineArray.push_back(Left.z);
LineArray.push_back(Color.x);
LineArray.push_back(Color.y);
LineArray.push_back(Color.z);

//Create buffer
glGenBuffers(1, &m_Buffer);
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, m_Buffer);
int SizeInBytes = LineArray.size() * 6 * sizeof(float);
glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, SizeInBytes, NULL, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

//Upload buffer data
glBufferSubData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0, sizeof(float) * LineArray.size(), &LineArray[0]);

And this is how I display it every tick:

glPushMatrix();

//Translate
glTranslatef(m_Position.x, m_Position.y, m_Position.z);
//Rotate
glMultMatrixf(m_RotationMatrix);

//Bind buffers for vertex and color arrays
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, m_Buffer);

glEnableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
glVertexPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 6 * sizeof(float), 0);
glEnableClientState(GL_COLOR_ARRAY);
glColorPointer(3, GL_FLOAT, 6 * sizeof(float), (void*)12);

//Draw
glDrawArrays(GL_LINES, 0, 36);

glDisableClientState(GL_VERTEX_ARRAY);
glDisableClientState(GL_COLOR_ARRAY);

//Unbind the buffers
glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, 0);

glPopMatrix();

I've never used GL_COLOR_ARRAY before, but I based the code off of successful use of GL_NORMAL_ARRAY. Can someone point out what's wrong?

EDIT: On the offchance that I'm setting up my basic OpenGL parameters wrong (lighting in particular), here are those:

m_AmbientLight = {0.5f, 0.5f, 0.5f, 1.0f};
m_DiffuseLight = {1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f, 1.0f};
m_LightPos = {8.0f, -16.0f, 8.0f, 0.0f};

//Smooth Shading
glShadeModel(GL_SMOOTH);

// Set color and depth clear value
glClearDepth(1.f);
//Color here is in RGB, converted to a 0-1 scale.
glClearColor(0.3f, 0.3f, 0.3f, 1.f);

// Enable Z-buffer read and write
glEnable(GL_DEPTH_TEST);
glDepthMask(GL_TRUE);

///
///LIGHTING
///
//Set up lighting.
//This activates the ambient light.
glLightfv(GL_LIGHT0, GL_AMBIENT, m_AmbientLight);
//This activates the diffuse light.
glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_DIFFUSE, m_DiffuseLight);
//This sets the position of the diffuse light.
glLightfv(GL_LIGHT1, GL_POSITION, m_LightPos);
//This enables the light.
glEnable(GL_LIGHT0);
glEnable(GL_LIGHT1);
//Enables all lighting...?
glEnable(GL_LIGHTING);
glEnable(GL_COLOR_MATERIAL);
//glEnable(GL_NORMALIZE);

// Setup a perspective projection
glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
glLoadIdentity();
gluPerspective(60.f, 1.33f, 0.1f, 512.f);

EDIT 2: Having established that glColor3f() also doesn't have any effect, I wonder if my shaders are the problem:

Vert shader:

void main()
{
vec3 normal, lightDir;
vec4 diffuse;
float NdotL;

normal = normalize(gl_NormalMatrix * gl_Normal);

lightDir = normalize(vec3(gl_LightSource[0].position));

NdotL = max(dot(normal, lightDir), 0.0);

diffuse = gl_FrontMaterial.diffuse * gl_LightSource[0].diffuse;
gl_FrontColor =  NdotL * diffuse;

gl_Position = ftransform();
}

Frag shader:

void main()
{
gl_FragColor = gl_Color;
}
share|improve this question
    
For what it's worth, that looks right to me. Maybe the error is elsewhere. You don't have texturing enabled by any chance do you? –  Tim Jun 18 '12 at 16:43
    
No texture, but lighting. Maybe that's the problem? –  GarrickW Jun 18 '12 at 16:48
    
If you want to use the same color for all your lines, you could just use glColor3f instead. –  fintelia Jun 18 '12 at 21:02
    
glColor3f doesn't work, neither with nor without lighting, for whatever reason (probably the same reason). Also, I was under the impression that function is deprecated. –  GarrickW Jun 19 '12 at 4:57
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Not 100% positive, but I don't believe you should have GL_COLOR_MATERIAL enabled while you draw the lines. Try disabling that.

edit (copied from comment):

Your shader doesn't make sense to me. You should just be passing in a color, and then passing that color straight to the fragment shader. Why are you using a lighting shader to draw lines? You should create a different shader that doesn't use any of that materials stuff. Enabling/disabling lighting has no effect unless you're using fixed function pipeline. I think you're mixing up fixed function commands with your shaders and getting confused.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, okay - I just tried that, and the lines seem somewhat paler now, but still very much grey. Weird. I tried it both with and without also disabling GL_LIGHTING, but only GL_COLOR_MATERIAL seems to make things paler. I don't know if that's actually an improvement though... but it might be a clue. –  GarrickW Jun 19 '12 at 6:32
    
@GarrickW Oh, ok I just read your post again, your shader doesn't make sense to me. Are you attempting to apply lighting to your line segments? You should just be passing in a color, and then passing that color straight to the fragment shader. Why are you using a lighting shader to draw lines? You should create a different shader that doesn't use any of that materials stuff. Enabling/disabling lighting has no effect unless you're using fixed function pipeline. I think you're mixing up fixed function commands with your shaders and getting confused. –  Tim Jun 19 '12 at 6:42
    
Ah, so the shader shouldn't apply to lines - I guess I have to have two sets of shaders, then? I have that shader because I have other objects in the scene that are normal triangular meshes that are supposed to be affected by lighting and such (and it seems to be working fine). –  GarrickW Jun 19 '12 at 6:51
    
@GarrickW You could probably cheat and use the fixed function pipeline to draw the lines (glUseProgram(0)), but in a perfect world you would have one shader to draw your lighting-applied objects, and another shader to draw the lines, which takes no input from the global materials or lighting. –  Tim Jun 19 '12 at 6:55
    
Hallelujah, it works! I took the default shader from ShaderMaker for the lines, and it works like a charm now - bright red lines, properly shaded models. Now I even know how to use multiple shaders, which isn't nearly as scary as I thought. Thank you for taking the time to help me figure this out! –  GarrickW Jun 19 '12 at 7:03
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Sounds to me like you've got lighting enabled while drawing the lines, hence the color of the vertex data being overridden by the color of the illumination calculation. Add a glDisable(GL_LIGHTING) right before the glDrawArrays.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I do have lighting - I didn't think of that when I first made the post, but that may well have something to do with it. I just tried your suggestion, though, and it sadly didn't work. I updated the original post with all the lighting stuff I do when the program starts up; maybe there's something in there that's incorrect. I also tried disabling GL_LIGHT0 and GL_LIGHT1, and that didn't help. –  GarrickW Jun 18 '12 at 16:50
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