Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to read a list of values from a text file hello.txt and store them in an array.

counter=0

cat hello.txt | while read line; do
 ${Unix_Array[${counter}]}=$line;
 let counter=counter+1;
    echo $counter;
done

echo ${Unix_Array[0]}
echo ${Unix_Array[1]}
echo ${Unix_Array[2]}

I am not able to assign values to the array Unix_Array[].. The echo statement does not print the contents of the array.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There are a few syntax errors here, but the clear problem is that the assignments are happening, but you're in an implied subshell. By using a pipe, you've created a subshell for the entire while statement. When the while statement is done the subshell exits and your Unix_Array ceases to exist.

In this case, the simplest fix is not to use a pipe:

counter=0

while read line; do
  Unix_Array[$counter]=$line;
  let counter=counter+1;
  echo $counter;
done < hello.txt

echo ${Unix_Array[0]}
echo ${Unix_Array[1]}
echo ${Unix_Array[2]}

By the way, you don't really need the counter. An easier way to write this might be:

$ oIFS="$IFS" # Save the old input field separator
$ IFS=$'\n'   # Set the IFS to a newline
$ some_array=($(<hello.txt)) # Splitting on newlines, assign the entire file to an array
$ echo "${some_array[2]}" # Get the third element of the array
c
$ echo "${#some_array[@]}" # Get the length of the array
4
share|improve this answer
1  
The implied subshell didn't even occur to me. –  mkb Jun 18 '12 at 17:36
add comment

If you are using bash v4 or higher, you can use mapfile to accomplish this:

mapfile -t Unix_Array < hello.txt

Otherwise, this should work:

while read -r line; do
   Unix_Array+=("$line")
done < hello.txt
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for calling out mapfile. I always forget about the new shell features. –  kojiro Jun 18 '12 at 17:42
add comment

Instead of this:

cat hello.txt | while read line; do
 ${Unix_Array[${counter}]}=$line;
 let counter=counter+1;
    echo $counter;
done

You can just do this:

Unix_Array=( `cat "hello.txt" `)
share|improve this answer
1  
This won't work if o.txt has embedded spaces in a line. –  Hai Vu Jun 18 '12 at 17:41
    
Without reassigning IFS, this will create multiple elements for any line with a space in it. –  kojiro Jun 18 '12 at 17:41
add comment

Its a solution:

count=0
Unix_Array=($(cat hello.txt))
array_size=$(cat hello.txt | wc -l)
for ((count=0; count < array_size; count++))
do
    echo ${Unix_Array[$count]}
done
share|improve this answer
    
This suffers from the same problem as Jon Lin's solution, namely, that you have to set IFS to a newline or you'll split on any whitespace in hello.txt. –  kojiro Jun 19 '12 at 12:14
    
You're right Thank you for your correction. –  Arthur Alves Jun 22 '12 at 13:19
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.