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I am using ShutdownBlockReasonCreate in my C# application to warn the user if a logoff/shutdown is going to effect a currently running method in my application.

I have two methods that will warn the user: An "Upload" method and a "Download" method.

If the user starts a long Upload, I set the ShutdownBlockReasonCreate with a message like "Upload is currently running".

The problem I am having is that if a user starts a simple download while the long upload is running, ShutdownBlockReasonCreate is also called again with a message like "Download is currently running".

This overwrites the original "Upload is currently running" message. So when my download method is finished, and I call ShutdownBlockReasonDestroy, the user is all of a sudden now able to shutdown and logoff even though the upload is still running.

I want to be able to call ShutdownBlockReasonCreate with an optional parameter that I can call so I can send it multiple strings on why the program will not allow windows to shutdown or logoff.

So when the user goes to logoff, I want it to display:

"Upload is currently running"
"Download is currently running"

if both an upload and download is running.


Can someone please modify my code to show me how to do this? If I can pass something else other than "this.Handle"; maybe I can accomplish this but I am unsure how to do this.

        //http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2012/06/14/10319617.aspx
        //http://bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2006/10/25/Windows-Vista-_2D00_-ShutdownBlockReasonCreate-in-C_2300_.aspx
        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        public extern static bool ShutdownBlockReasonCreate(IntPtr hWnd, [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string pwszReason);

        [DllImport("user32.dll")]
        public extern static bool ShutdownBlockReasonDestroy(IntPtr hWnd);

        private bool isBlocked = false;

        protected override void WndProc(ref Message aMessage)
        {
            const int WM_QUERYENDSESSION = 0x0011;
            const int WM_ENDSESSION = 0x0016;

            if (isBlocked && (aMessage.Msg == WM_QUERYENDSESSION || aMessage.Msg == WM_ENDSESSION))
                return;

            base.WndProc(ref aMessage);
        }

        private void StopShutdown(string strMessage)
        {
            try
            {
                //strMessage == Message to display in shutdown/logoff box
                if (ShutdownBlockReasonCreate(this.Handle, strMessage))
                {
                    isBlocked = true;
                   Console.WriteLine("++ StopShutdown successful");
                }
                else
                    Console.WriteLine("++ StopShutdown failed");

            }
            catch (Exception ext)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("++ StopShutdown Error:    " + ext.Message + " " + ext.StackTrace);
            }
        }

        private void ResetShutdown()
        {
            try
            {

                if (ShutdownBlockReasonDestroy(this.Handle))
                {
                    isBlocked = false;
                    Console.WriteLine("++ ResetShutdown successful");
                }
                else
                    Console.WriteLine("++ ResetShutdown failed");

            }
            catch (Exception ext)
            {
                MessageBox.Show("++ ResetShutdown Error:    " + ext.Message + " " + ext.StackTrace);
            }
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            StopShutdown("Upload in Progress");
            MessageBox.Show("Upload in Progress");
            ResetShutdown();
        }

        private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            StopShutdown("Download in Progress");
            MessageBox.Show("Download in Progress");
            ResetShutdown();
        }
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1  
Just set the message based on what's currently running (which you'll need to keep track of in a central location in your program) and only destroy the reason if neither there are zero blocking operations. –  dlev Jun 18 '12 at 19:07
    
I tried that and it did not work. I passed the same string to ShutdownBlockReasonDestroy(this.Handle, strMessage) that I started ShutdownBlockReasonCreate(this.Handle, strMessage) with and it did not work. Only one message was registered, and as soon as I destroy that message, the computer will allow a logoff/shutdown even though I started another ShutdownBlockReasonCreate with a different message. –  fraXis Jun 18 '12 at 19:15
    
I'll post an answer that better describes what I mean. There's no way for this approach to "not work" :) –  dlev Jun 18 '12 at 19:18
    
A process can produce only one message. You are writing code that will never be used, users will always override and force a shutdown. –  Hans Passant Jun 18 '12 at 19:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In order to ensure that the correct message is displayed, and that the message is always displayed (and shutdown prevented) if a blocking operation is in progress, you need to keep careful track of what is occurring in your system.

For example, suppose you could have any number of uploads and downloads running simultaneously. In that case, your StopShutdown() method needs to determine what operations are currently occurring. If there is at least one upload, but no download, then set the message to "Upload in progress." If there is at least one download, but no upload, set the message to "Download in progress." If there is at least one of each, then set the message to "Upload and download in progress."

In your ResetShutdown() method, you need to again check which operations are still in progress. If there are none, then you should destroy the reason, and set isBlocked back to false. Otherwise, you should adjust the message based on what's currently running, and leave isBlocked as true.

By doing that, you ensure that you both have the correct shutdown method, and then also only allow shutdown if your program is not in the middle of an operation that should block shutdown.

(Also, you should keep in mind that users are free to "Force Shutdown" the system, even if you "block" it, so a safer approach is often to try to suspend what you're doing and then resume at a later point.)

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