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Suppose you have a Java class hierarchy of about 30 classes, with a base class BaseClass and two main subclasses (SubclassA, SubclassB) with several subclasses each. A few of these subclasses have a certain behavior. Let's say you can "poke" them, changing their state. (This is a new requirement adding behavior to an existing hierarchy. "Poke" is meaningless to the majority of classes.)

interface Pokeable {
  void poke();
  int getTimesPoked();
}


public class Pokey extends SubclassB 
implements Pokeable {
  private int timesPoked = 0;
  public void poke() {
    timesPoked++;
  }
  public int getTimesPoked() {
    return timesPoked;
  }
}

Should this be done by implementing Pokeable in only those classes that need it, and then doing the following in all code that must poke any object that's pokeable?

public void process(BaseClass b) {
  if (b instanceof Pokeable) {
    ((Pokeable)b).poke();
  }
}

Or should the entire hierarchy implement Pokeable for the sake of the few that really ARE Pokeable?

interface Pokeable {
  void poke();
  int getTimesPoked();
  boolean isReallyPokeable();
}

public class BaseClass implements Pokeable {
  public void poke() {}
  public int getTimesPoked() { return 0; }
  public boolean isReallyPokeable() { return false;}
}

public class Pokey {
  private int timesPoked = 0;
  @Override
  public void poke() {
    timesPoked++;
  }
  @Override
  public int getTimesPoked() {
    return timesPoked;
  }
  @Override
  public boolean isReallyPokeable() {
    return true;
  }
}

public void process(BaseClass b) {
  b.poke();
}

Edit added: It's kind of a Double Dispatch problem. Where "poker" code does something to an object, it must call "poke()" if the object is "pokeable" but can't if not. Whether you "poke()" or not depends on whether something wants to poke and whether the object accepts being poked. I could use the Visitor pattern but that seems to make it more complicated.

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1  
Isn't there a level in your hierarchy where you could decide if the classes bellow are poakable? By any chance, do these classes need to be poakeable only for testing? –  Morfic Jun 18 '12 at 19:22
    
Unfortunately no. Most of SubclassA's subclasses are Pokeable. A few of SubclassB's subclasses are Pokeable. Subclass A and Subclass B are very different, and Pokeability can't be factored out without multiple inheritance, which Java doesn't have. –  Mark Lutton Jun 18 '12 at 19:26
    
In this case, maybe you could try composition over inheritance to separate between "base poakeable classes" and "base non-poakeable classes". A short description on how you're going to poke the classes might help in elaborating a more concise solution. –  Morfic Jun 18 '12 at 19:33
    
Multiple inheritance wouldn't really solve the problem anyway as you'd still have to use "instanceof" for any given object. So the question might be: is it better to use "instanceof" than to have non-Pokeable classes implement Pokeable? –  Mark Lutton Jun 18 '12 at 19:33
    
Hmmm, then maybe extracting an interface for BaseA and BaseB, and then create a decorator that you can attach to the ones that are poakeable. My problem is that I do not fully understand how you're going to create all the instances and how you're going to poke the poakeable ones, if you catch my drift. –  Morfic Jun 18 '12 at 19:39
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If a class is not pokable, I would recommend against it implementing the Pokeable interface, simply because that would be confusing.

Take one of the following approaches instead.

  • Create an abstract or concrete subclass of BaseClass that implements Pokable, and have all of your to-be-Pokeable subclasses extend it. This approach works well if poke()ing is achieved via the same logic in all of the implementing classes.
  • Have each subclass implement Pokeable individually
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A far better answer than mine. +1 –  BlackVegetable Jun 18 '12 at 19:23
    
Unfortunately SubclassA / SubclassB is one dimension; Pokeable / non-Pokeable is another dimension. Just for a guess at the numbers, 20 are Pokeable SubclassA, 5 are non-Pokeable SubclassA, 5 are Pokeable SubclassB, 30 are non-Pokeable SubclassB. –  Mark Lutton Jun 18 '12 at 19:30
    
How about: BaseClass does not implement Pokeable but has do-nothing poke() and getTimesPoked() methods anyway. Pokeable subclasses override those two. process(BaseClass b) can call b.poke() without using instanceof. Really-pokeable subclasses implement Pokeable; others don't. This seems to work but somehow something seems wrong about the style, as "implements Pokeable" might as well be a comment "// implements Pokeable". –  Mark Lutton Jun 18 '12 at 20:12
    
@MarkLutton Why exactly do you not want to implement Pokeable the individual classes to which it applies? Because that feels haphazard, or because it's a lot of work, or? –  cheeken Jun 18 '12 at 20:17
    
Only because it requires "instanceof" in the calling code. if (o instanceof Pokeable) { ((Pokeable)o).poke();} If that looks OK, then that's what I'll do. –  Mark Lutton Jun 18 '12 at 20:25
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I think by having a method called "isReallyX" is a warning sign. If someone views a class at a glance and sees that it is "Pokeable" they may try to poke it and end up with unexpected behavior because it wasn't really pokeable.

I would take your former approach at it does not mislead outside programmers (or yourself after two months of ignoring this code!)

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An isReallyPokeable method is dubious, but instanceof is even moreso. If one has types A, B:A, C:B, along with Pokeable versions of each, there will be no single type that embodies the concept of a Pokeable B, since a Pokeable C doesn't inherit from Pokeable B, but instead is Pokeable and inherits from C (which not pokeable and inherits from B). If A includes Poke and isReallyPokeable methods, and one has a collection of B, and doesn't let anything that's not Pokeable get added, then one can use Pokey methods on things in that collection directly. –  supercat Dec 19 '13 at 23:22
    
@supercat You may have just blown my mind. –  BlackVegetable Dec 19 '13 at 23:29
    
My point was that real-world problems don't always line up cleanly with inheritance; if one knows when a class is written that some derived classes will implement some functionality, others won't, and those implementing the functionality will not share a common base class, then having the base class include methods for that functionality along with a method to say whether it is supported is "less evil" than requiring client code to use instanceof checks and typecasts. –  supercat Dec 19 '13 at 23:38
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Your subclasses could be abstract if you don't want to implement all the methods of the parent class. But....

Or should the entire hierarchy implement Pokeable for the sake of the few that really ARE Pokeable?

Definitely no... Classes that are not pokeable should not implement the pokeable interface.

Should this be done by implementing Pokeable in only those classes that need it, and then doing the following in all code that must poke any object that's pokeable?

This is a slightly better model... However, it's a very procedural design.

Could also keep a Collection of the <Pokeable> objets off to the side somewhere, then iterate quickly through that set to poke them all?

Could you have the pokeable classes register with an event dispatcher? ...So when a certain event takes place, all the classes are poked?

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Actually no. In the real application we do instantiate SubclassA when it doesn't have to be one of SubclassA's own subclasses. –  Mark Lutton Jun 18 '12 at 19:24
    
"event dispatcher": it's a bit more complicated than that. The thing doing the "poking" is the thing that does something to a particular object, so only one object is poked at a time. –  Mark Lutton Jun 18 '12 at 19:40
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