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I am trying to create a CLR procedure to export SQL data to Excel that will contain more features than other options such as subtotals and highlighting.

This requires me to reference the Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel dll, but I'm not sure how to actually include the assembly when I compile my code.

How can I include the Excel assembly in my CLR procedure?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using Excel = Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel;
using System.Reflection;

public class ExportToExcel
{
[Microsoft.SqlServer.Server.SqlProcedure]
public static void ExportQueryResults(string queryText, string worksheetName, string fileName)
{
    using (SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection("context connection=true"))
    {
        //the temp list to hold the results in
        List<object[]> results = new List<object[]>();

        cnn.Open();
        //create the sql command
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(queryText, cnn);
        using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
        {
            int fieldCount = reader.FieldCount;
            object[] headers = new object[fieldCount];
            for(int i = 0; i < fieldCount; i++)
            {
                headers[i] = reader.GetName(i);
            }

            //read the results
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                object[] values = new object[fieldCount];
                for (int i = 0; i < fieldCount; i++)
                {
                    values[i] = reader[i];
                }
                results.Add(values);
            }

            //convert the results into a 2-d array to export into Excel
            object[,] exportVals = new object[results.Count, fieldCount];

            for (int row = 0; row < results.Count; row++)
            {
                for (int col = 0; col < fieldCount; col++)
                {
                    exportVals[row, col] = results[row][col];
                }
            }

            Excel.Application _app = new Excel.Application();
            Excel.Workbook _book = _app.Workbooks.Add(Missing.Value);
            Excel.Worksheet _sheet = (Excel.Worksheet)_book.ActiveSheet;
            Excel.Range _range = (Excel.Range)_sheet.Cells[1, 1];

            _range = _sheet.get_Range(_sheet.Cells[1, 1], _sheet.Cells[results.Count, fieldCount]);
            _range.Value2 = exportVals;

            _sheet.Name = worksheetName;

            //remove any extra worksheets
            foreach(Excel.Worksheet sht in _book.Worksheets)
            {
                if (sht.Name != worksheetName)
                    sht.Delete();
            }

            _book.SaveAs(fileName
                , Excel.XlFileFormat.xlWorkbookDefault
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value
                , false
                , false
                , Excel.XlSaveAsAccessMode.xlNoChange
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value);
        }
    }
}
}
share|improve this question
    
Why not write this as a .NET application? –  jrummell Jun 18 '12 at 21:00
    
Side note: You may not actually have to reference the assembly if you use reflection. –  Cameron Jun 18 '12 at 21:02
    
@Cameron - If Excel does as little as use a mutex or a synchronized collection, it just won't load and reflection cannot change that. –  Jirka Hanika Jun 18 '12 at 21:33

3 Answers 3

It is not possible to use arbitrary assemblies in SQL Server. You need to reference only a subset of the framework and excercise some basic discipline. I doubt that a monster application with layers of history such as Excel would load into this environment.

You may want to have a look at simpler substitute functionality that meets this criteria.

If you need more than that, consider using Excel on the client side.

share|improve this answer
    
Excel would not actually load into the SQL Server process - the COM interaction would be cross-process. Only a simple (and quite safe) COM interop assembly is loaded into the process doing the automation. But I agree it is a bit adventurous to drive Excel from inside your database. –  Govert Jun 19 '12 at 6:46
    
@Govert - You can't even statically reference a COM assembly from this environment. This can be worked around, but it is pretty complicated (codeproject.com/Articles/35952/…) and you still load only your own code and have nearly no benefits from executing inside SQL Server, just overhead and limitations. –  Jirka Hanika Jun 19 '12 at 7:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted

After a day of fumbling around with nearly every type of error possible, I came up with a solution for my problems.

I appreciate the answers/comments given, and although I agree there may be more efficient / secure ways of implementing a solution, using the interop assembly was the fastest and most familiar to complete this project.

Before I get raked over the coals, please realize that auto-filtering and other formatting outside the scope of the more traditional SQL Server export functionality were absolutely required for this project.

Solution

I created a class library output type visual studio project titled SqlProcedures, created a new class called ExportToExcel and added Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel to my references.

Here is the code in my ExportToExcel.cs file:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using Excel = Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

public class ExportToExcel
{
    [Microsoft.SqlServer.Server.SqlProcedure]
public static void ExportQueryResults(string queryText, string worksheetName, string fileName)
{
    using (SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection("context connection=true"))
    {
        //the temp list to hold the results in
        List<object[]> results = new List<object[]>();

        cnn.Open();
        //create the sql command
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(queryText, cnn);
        using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
        {
            int fieldCount = reader.FieldCount;
            object[] headers = new object[fieldCount];
            for (int i = 0; i < fieldCount; i++)
            {
                headers[i] = reader.GetName(i);
            }

            //read the results
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                object[] values = new object[fieldCount];
                for (int i = 0; i < fieldCount; i++)
                {
                    values[i] = reader[i];
                }
                results.Add(values);
            }

            //convert the results into a 2-d array to export into Excel
            object[,] exportVals = new object[results.Count, fieldCount];

            for (int row = 0; row < results.Count; row++)
            {
                for (int col = 0; col < fieldCount; col++)
                {
                    exportVals[row, col] = results[row][col];
                }
            }

            Excel.Application _app = new Excel.Application();
            Excel.Workbook _book = _app.Workbooks.Add(Missing.Value);
            Excel.Worksheet _sheet = (Excel.Worksheet)_book.ActiveSheet;
            Excel.Range _range = (Excel.Range)_sheet.Cells[1, 1];
            _app.DisplayAlerts = false;

            //set the headers and freeze the panes
            _range = _sheet.get_Range(_sheet.Cells[1, 1], _sheet.Cells[1, fieldCount]);
            _range.NumberFormat = "@";
            _range.HorizontalAlignment = Excel.XlHAlign.xlHAlignLeft;
            _range.Value2 = headers;
            _range.Font.Bold = true;
            _range = _sheet.get_Range(_sheet.Cells[2, 1], _sheet.Cells[2, 1]);
            _range.EntireRow.Select();
            _range.Application.ActiveWindow.FreezePanes = true;

            _range = _sheet.get_Range(_sheet.Cells[2, 1], _sheet.Cells[results.Count, fieldCount]);
            _range.Value2 = exportVals;

            _range = _sheet.get_Range(_sheet.Cells[1, 1], _sheet.Cells[exportVals.Length, fieldCount]);
            _range.AutoFilter(1, Type.Missing, Excel.XlAutoFilterOperator.xlAnd, Type.Missing, true);
            _sheet.Cells.Columns.AutoFit();
            _sheet.Range["A1"].Select();

            _sheet.Name = worksheetName;

            //remove any extra worksheets
            foreach (Excel.Worksheet sht in _book.Worksheets)
            {
                if (sht.Name != worksheetName)
                    sht.Delete();
            }

            _book.SaveAs(fileName
                , Excel.XlFileFormat.xlExcel5
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value
                , false
                , false
                , Excel.XlSaveAsAccessMode.xlNoChange
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value
                , Missing.Value);

            //_book.Close(Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value);
            _app.Application.Quit();

            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(_range);
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(_sheet);
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(_book);
            Marshal.ReleaseComObject(_app);

            _range = null;
            _sheet = null;
            _book = null;
            _app = null;
            GC.Collect();
            GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
        }
    }
}
}

After sucessfully building the DLL, I copied it to a local directory on my SQL server.

In order to run the procedure ExportQueryResults, I needed to add several assemblies in the SQL server that the Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.dll depends on.

Here is my SQL code:

ALTER DATABASE main SET TRUSTWORTHY ON;

create assembly [stdole] from
'C:\Program Files\Microsoft.NET\Primary Interop Assemblies\stdole.dll'
WITH PERMISSION_SET = unsafe
create assembly [Office] from
'C:\WINDOWS\assembly\GAC\office\12.0.0.0__71e9bce111e9429c\OFFICE.DLL'
WITH PERMISSION_SET = unsafe

create assembly [Vbe] 
    FROM 'C:\WINDOWS\assembly\GAC\Microsoft.Vbe.Interop\12.0.0.0__71e9bce111e9429c\Microsoft.Vbe.Interop.dll'
WITH PERMISSION_SET = unsafe


create assembly [Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.dll] 
from 'C:\WINDOWS\assembly\GAC\Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel\12.0.0.0__71e9bce111e9429c\Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.dll'
WITH PERMISSION_SET = unsafe

create assembly SqlProcedures from 'c:\sql_data_reporting\SqlProcedures.dll'
WITH PERMISSION_SET = unsafe
go
create procedure ExportToExcel @queryText nvarchar(4000), @worksheetName nvarchar(32),     @fileName nvarchar(250)
as external name SqlProcedures.ExportToExcel.ExportQueryResults
go

Now I know that using with permission_set = unsafe is a nono, but this was a "get it done now" project, and this was the fastest solution I could come up with.

Hopefully this solution will save some time for others who need to implement similar functionality.

share|improve this answer

I believe that you can simply add the referenced assembly the same way you added your core assembly. The problem is that the interop assembly is a thin wrapper around the Excel COM object. This means that the interop will be worthless unless you also install Microsoft Excel on your SQL Server. I'm not even sure if this is possible, but it sounds like a really, really bad idea.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll bite: Why is it a bad idea? –  Cameron Jun 18 '12 at 21:04
    
@Cameron - Microsoft Excel is a notoriously bad piece of software to have on any server. It is not optimized for a server environment and in many cases requires user interaction - impossible on a server. Also, it is extremely expensive from a processor perspective. Having even a few instances running simultaneously is going to severely hamper your servers abilities to process requests. I work at a larger coporation and I'd guess that we have, on average, a 50 or 60 ABENDed batch jobs a year because of an Excel issue. –  JDB Jun 18 '12 at 21:21
    
The ABENDed jobs are on an application server, where performance isn't an issue and jobs can simply be restarted. On a production database server, the results would be much more catastrophic and end up in downtime for your users (rather than just a delayed report). –  JDB Jun 18 '12 at 21:23
    
Thanks for the detailed response! –  Cameron Jun 18 '12 at 21:31

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