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I have this:

#!/bin/sh

handle_exit()
{
    # if func2 called first then do some thing to kill func1 also 
    # if func1 called first then do some thing to kill func2 also 

    exit
}

func1()
{
    for i in `seq 40`
    do
        echo I am in func1 $i
        sleep 3

        if [ "$i" = "20" ] ; then # this could be a failure condition
            handle_exit 
        fi
    done
}

func2()
{
    for i in `seq 40`
    do
        echo I am in func2 $i
        sleep 3

        if [ "$i" = "10" ] ; then # this could be a failure condition
            handle_exit             
        fi
    done
}

func1 &

pidfunc1=$!

func2 &

pidfunc2=$!

How do I want it to behave:

  1. Call func1 and func2 as a subprocess. ( already does this)
  2. If an error occurs while func1 is running, then call handle_exit which should exit func1 and also kill func2.
  3. Same as #2 but for func2. If an error occurs while func2 is running, then call handle_exit which should exit func2 and also kill func1.

Can you help?

share|improve this question
    
No it won't. It will only exit the subprocess. You can try that. –  abc Jun 18 '12 at 21:22
    
There should be an ampersand after foo. I am calling func1 and func2 in back ground. Notice the ampersand. –  abc Jun 18 '12 at 21:30

1 Answer 1

Put the following in the beginning of your script:

pidfunc1=0;
pidfunc2=0;

handle_exit()
{

    if [ "pidfunc1" != "0" ] ; then
            kill -9 $pidfunc1
            echo "killed 1"
    fi
    if [ "pidfunc2" != "0" ] ; then
            kill -9 $pidfunc2
            echo "killed 2"
    fi

}
share|improve this answer
    
This will not work if func1 calls handle_exit first. This is because func1 will always have both pidfunc1 and pidfunc2 initialized to 0...always. –  abc Jun 18 '12 at 23:30
    
Yes, you are right, my solution only works if func2 calls handle_exit first. Since that's not what you want you would have to communicate func2's PID to func1 - a quick hack would be to create a PID file in which both functions write their PID. –  timos Jun 18 '12 at 23:34
    
Thanks. Any other solution? I don't want to create files. –  abc Jun 18 '12 at 23:36
    
I think it can not work without files: The two processes need to communicate somehow. Since they are processes, not threads, they have different address spaces and can not communicate directly (without hacky stuff such as xpmem). So the only thing I can think of are files, or named pipes (which are also files). –  timos Jun 18 '12 at 23:50

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