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Good Day,

I have a simple working routine in Perl that swaps two words:

i.e. John Doe -----> Doe John

Here it is:

sub SwapTokens()
{
    my ($currentToken) = @_;

    $currentToken =~ s/([A-Za-z]+) ([A-Za-z]+)/$2 $1/;
    # $currentToken =~ s/(\u\L) (\u\L)/$2 $1/;
    return $currentToken;
} 

The following usage yields exactly what I want:

print &SwapTokens("John Doe");

But when I uncomment out the line '$currentToken =~ s/(\u\L) (\u\L)/$2 $1/;

I get an error. Am I missing something, it looks like my syntax is correct.

TIA,

coson

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1  
Could really help if you elaborate more than "I get an error"; why are you trying the second regex if the first one already works as required? –  lanzz Jun 18 '12 at 21:56
    
The error I'm receiving is: syntax error at script.pl line XX, near "(\u\L) (\u\L" Illegal declaration of subroutine main::IsTitleCase2 at scriptname.pl –  coson Jun 18 '12 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

up vote -4 down vote accepted

\L means "lowercase till \E"; i.e., it needs to be followed at some point by \E. You do not have \E in your regex, thus it is not valid; adding \E after each \L gets the script to compile, though I have no idea what you are actually trying to accomplish there.

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I'm trying to swap two words with each other. The regex I'm using should account for title case words. –  coson Jun 18 '12 at 22:04
    
Tried that and got: Quantifier follows nothing in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/(+ <-- HERE ) (+)/ at scriptname.pl line 31. –  coson Jun 18 '12 at 22:08
1  
\u.\L.*\E is the same as ..*, and [[:upper:]][[:lower:]]* is basically an old way of doing the (previously posted) \p{Lu}\p{Ll}+. –  ikegami Jun 19 '12 at 6:03

\u is not a regex atom that match a uppercase letter. \L is not a regex atom that match a number of lowercase letters. You're looking for

s/(\p{Lu}\p{Ll}+) (\p{Lu}\p{Ll}+)/$2 $1/;

\p{Lu}  Uppercase letter.
\p{Ll}  Lowercase letter.

$ unichars '\p{Lu}' | head -n 5
 A  U+0041 LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A
 B  U+0042 LATIN CAPITAL LETTER B
 C  U+0043 LATIN CAPITAL LETTER C
 D  U+0044 LATIN CAPITAL LETTER D
 E  U+0045 LATIN CAPITAL LETTER E

$ unichars '\p{Ll}' | head -n 5
 a  U+0061 LATIN SMALL LETTER A
 b  U+0062 LATIN SMALL LETTER B
 c  U+0063 LATIN SMALL LETTER C
 d  U+0064 LATIN SMALL LETTER D
 e  U+0065 LATIN SMALL LETTER E
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+1 for using the unicode properties, it could really start an interesting discussion if the OP is interested. ) –  raina77ow Jun 18 '12 at 22:18
2  
@raina77ow, The bigger issue is the belief that names follow such a limited pattern. –  ikegami Jun 18 '12 at 22:24

Perhaps you're looking for something like this:

sub swap_the_words {
  my ($processed_string) = @_;
  $processed_string =~ s/([A-Z][A-Za-z]+) ([A-Z][A-Za-z]+)/$2 $1/;
  return $processed_string;
}
print swap_the_words('John Doe'); # prints Doe John

As for \u and \l, they are good for modifying the string - not the regex. For example, you can slightly alter your script like that...

  $processed_string =~ s/([a-z]+) ([a-z]+)/\u\L$2\E \u\L$1\E/i;
  ...
  print swap_the_words('cOsOn hAcKeR'); # Hacker Coson

... so your words are not only swapped, but given the proper case as well. Note, though, that these modifiers are used in the replacement part of s/// operator.

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Ahh, wasn't aware that they're good for modifying the string... –  coson Jun 18 '12 at 22:57

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