Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a document structure that can be searched easily while maintaining a rebuildable structure. By that I mean the document itself holds the information required for a CMS to build the needed forms for updating the document.

The key point being that the final structure of the document will never be known, as it will built / modified via the CMS.

The goal is to ensure the front end content methods can search quickly, while making the CMS able to rebuild the content so it can be managed. I have no qualms with making the admin area of the CMS work harder, speed is not as crucial there.

Here is a basic example

This is a highly abbreviated document, but it may illustrate my points. This document is relatively easy to query, but it has no structural information about how a CMS would display it.

{
"name" : "Page Name",
"title" : "Page Title",
"description" : "Page Description",
"page_heading" : "New Heading",
"content_body" : "<p>New Content</p>",
"slideshow" :
    [

        { 
        "image_title" : "Vacation Hawaii",
        "image_file" : "hawaii100.jpg"
        },
        { 
        "image_title" : "Vacation Spain",
        "image_file" : "Spain200.jpg"
        },
    ]
}

Here is an example with abbreviated structural data

The problem with this approach is that queries become more difficult.

> db.posts.find( { page_heading.value : "example" } )

--

 {

"name" : "Page Name",
"title" : "Page Title",
"description" : "Page Description",

"page_heading" :
{

    "value" : "This is the page heading",
    "type" : "string",

},
"content_body" :
{

    "value" : "<p>HTML Content</p>",
    "type" : "html_textarea",

},
"slideshow" :
{
    "type" : 
    { 
        "image_title" : "string",
        "image_file" : "file"
    },
    "value" : 
    [
        { 
            "image_title" : "Vacation Hawaii",
            "image_file" : "hawaii100.jpg"
        },
        { 
            "image_title" : "Vacation Spain",
            "image_file" : "Spain200.jpg"
        },
    ]
}
}

Alternative Approach

Having separate documents, one for the data and one for the template, seems like a possible solution, but increases the logistical complexity a bit.

Content Document linking to template

 {
"name" : "Page Name",
"title" : "Page Title",
"description" : "Page Description",
"template" : "document_id",
"page_heading" : "New Heading",
"content_body" : "<p>New Content</p>",
"slideshow" :
    [

    { 
        "image_title" : "Vacation Hawaii",
        "image_file" : "hawaii100.jpg"
    },
    { 
        "image_title" : "Vacation Spain",
        "image_file" : "Spain200.jpg"
    },
    ]

}

Template Document

{
"parent" : "document_id",
"page_heading" :
{

    "type" : "string",
    "required" : true

},
"content_body" :
{

    "type" : "html_textarea",
    "required" : true


},
"slideshow" :
{
    "type" : 
    { 
        "image_title" : "string",
        "image_file" : "file"
    }
}   
}

What is the best approach?

It is highly possible that I am over complicating the whole thing and that there is a simple solution right in front of me.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry if I've missed this in your question, but define "best". Scalable? Efficient? Why do search queries become "more difficult" in the second approach? What is the intended audience of the CMS - you, or the world at large? –  Clancy Hood Jun 18 '12 at 22:38
    
Thank you for your input on this. I thought I defined best by saying efficient in terms of query speed, but scalable, and overall efficiency in terms of dealing with the documents are important as well. I can index on only known fields, since most of the fields wont be known, it seems like queries will be quicker without embedded documents as there are in the approach with the structure mixed with the data. The CMS will be used publicaly. –  sterling Jun 18 '12 at 22:43
    
With the fields unknowable, sounds like you could do with a full text index linked to the document id elsewhere - how you then trigger updates to this index would be your next challenge. MongoDB doesn't lend itself to comprehensive full text searching -mongodb.org/display/DOCS/… –  Clancy Hood Jun 18 '12 at 22:56
    
I was planning on investigating a search option such as elasticsearch later, but it sounds like you dont think a single document with both the data and structural info is a bad approach. –  sterling Jun 18 '12 at 23:45
    
We're not really supposed to go into personal preferences, but I usually opt to split data into its atomic conceptual entities if I intend to build in scalability. That said, difficult to judge without knowing your program as intimately as you - you will appreciate the consequences of having to alter structure later better than I, and so need to weigh this against moving on quickly with your project. –  Clancy Hood Jun 18 '12 at 23:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Great question, which I found myself scratching my head for quite some time. I'll give the short gist of what I've done, but in short: yes please DO separate the stuff. I've gone a bit further, but then again, I might have had some other requirements.

Consider the following.

  • An Entity can be anything from a Product to a Blogpost (defined by it's role. An Entity can have multiple roles) .
  • An Entity has a lot of Facts .
  • Everything known about an entity like the title, description, slug, hero-image, author, etc. is saved as a Fact to that entity.
  • All write operations work on Facts and Facts alone. (In other words, the editing part of the app is only concerned about facts, since facts work on any type of page, my editing-code (current implemented as modals) work on any type of page)
  • Facts can be of any given type, but that type must be defined in a FactSchema. The CMS allows Factschemas to be created on the fly, thus enabling new types of facts.
  • The way in which a fact can be edited (say something like openinghours with multiple dropdowns per openinghour slot) may be totally different in the way in which it is presented. Therefore I needed the possibility for transformers (between write and read). Now, this may not be needed for you, but this led me to the following:
  • Facts are never used directly for displaying (thus reading) pages. Instead they are only loaded lazily, when the fact is in edit-mode. This saves a lot of bandwidth, because a lot of stuff, like history, in progress changes, allowed editing roles, etc. may be saved with the fact
  • To make facts available for reading each entity has a .c (for calculated) property. Each fact upon create/change is saved with the name of the fact as a key under that property (applying transformers if defined.)
  • The current method for rendering is that I flatten .c in my object just before throwing the resulting JSON to a server-side templating engine for rendering. (Thus, all properties in .c become properties of the containing object)

That's about it. Moreover, ZERO presentation logic is defined in these models, this is defined in Mustache/Hogan templates instead. (with a couple of mixed-in javascript functions if I need to extend what's possible with logic-less templates, as far is presentation logic is concerned) .

Searching could/should be done on facts as defined in .c. Although I'm doing that through Elasticsearch.

Here's those 3 schema declarations (simplified) (p.s: the schema's are in Node.js but that shouldn't bother you)

 var fact= new Schema(
     {

        //_id undefined > defaulting to mongoDB objectid instead

        //factschema is looked-up by name
    name: { type: String, required: true, index: { unique: false }}

    //value can be any type, but for a particular instance the type is restricted as set in FactSchema.valueType
    ,value: {type:  {}, required: true} 


    ,createddate : { type: Date, required: true, default: Date.now, select: false }
 }



 var entity= new Schema(
   facts:  { type:[require('./fact')], select:false}
    ,roles: {type: [String], required: true, index: {unique: false}}    
    ,c: {type:  {}}  //all calculated stuff based on facts
 }



 var factSchema= new Schema({
     name: { type: String, required: true, index: { unique: true }}
     , valueType: { type: {}, required: true} //any type may be defined (simple types but also complex-types which have a ref to their own schema) , fact-instances are checked to adhere to the specified type  in pre-save handlers. 
     ,roles: {type: [String], required: true} //roles that are allowed to contain facts based on this factschema
     ,isMulti: {type: Boolean, required: true }

     //format to show edit-mode in.
     ,formFieldType: {type: String, required: true} 

     //ACL-stuff
     ,directChangeRoles: {type: [String]} //i.e: [super, admin,owner]
     ,suggestChangeRoles: {type: [String]} //ie: [editor]
}

I must say this works rather well. Hth.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this wonderfully detailed answer. Indeed you did go a bit further, but you've got me thinking in different directions now. Are you saving the factschema in mongo as well? –  sterling Jun 19 '12 at 17:59
    
Yes indeed, everything is defined in Mongo. As for factSchema.formFieldType which might not be clear from the name, the name defined here is used client-side to lookup the format to show the fact in. This isn't necessarily just 1 form-field, but could potentially be many form-fields (e.g: in the case of the 'opening-hours' example) that together map to 1 fact. Code to do the mapping back from fields to Json is supplied in that client-side code as well. –  Geert-Jan Jun 19 '12 at 18:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.