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I originally had the return true/false in my ajax callback, and realized it's probably not in the right context to be called, so I rewrote my function as follows, but it is still not working. Is the submit variable not carrying through from the callback function either? The confirmation (if .btn-danger) is working, but not just if you hit submit and confirmation is not needed)

$('#form').submit(function(e){
    var submit = false;
    if($('.btn-danger').length){
        submit = true;
    } else {
        $.ajax({
            url: base_path+"ajax/myajaxfile",
            type: "post",
            data: {
                data1 : $("#amount").val(),
                data2 : $("option:selected").val()
            },
            dataType: "json",
            success: function(data) {
                if (data.needconfirmation === 'true'){
                        $('#edit-submit').val("Confirm");
                        $('#edit-submit').removeClass("btn-primary");
                        $('#edit-submit').addClass("btn-danger");
                        $('#payment-form').after('<span class="warning"> Do you really wanna?</span>');
                } else {
                    submit = true;
                }
            },
            error: function(data) {
                alert("an error has occurred");
            }
        });
    }
    if (submit){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
});
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1  
Your code looks like sometimes you want a traditional submission, while others you want an AJAX submission. That doesn't sound right though, is it? If not, what do you want to happen when .btn-danger has length? What do you want to happen when it does not? –  Colin Jun 18 '12 at 22:19
    
the form itself is being submitted conventionally with a submit button on the form. The ajax call does a db check to determine whether I should require the user to confirm their action before submitting, otherwise it should just go right through normally. I guess maybe I need to do this on click instead of on form-submit and then programmatically call form submit within the callback... –  Damon Jun 19 '12 at 13:19

3 Answers 3

$.ajax is asynchronous, so the rest of your code continues on before the success callback happens, so it setting submit = true doesn't affect the check at the end of your function.

The confirmation (if .btn-danger) is working, but not just if you hit submit and confirmation is not needed

How do you know if confirmation is needed or not? You may want to add a check for that where you check for .btn-danger.

Also, you can clean up the last bit of your code by just doing

return submit;
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Checking for .btn-danger is how I do it.. –  Damon Jun 19 '12 at 15:36

One of the most confusing aspects of doing AJAX for the first time is Asynchronous part. With normal Javascript (well, normal jQuery at least), you handle a submit like so:

$('#form').submit(function(e){
    var submit = /*Figure out if it was a success or not*/;
    if (submit){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
});

An event triggers a submission, you figure out whether or not it's valid, and then you either proceed or you don't.

With an AJAX submission though that "Figure out if it was a success" step happens outside the normal flow of things. This means that what you want to do is ALWAYS return false; you don't know whether to proceed yet, so don't proceed. Your AJAX callback (the "success:" function in your AJAX call's options) is whether the "figure out" code goes, and your's currently has the right idea with "success = true" ... except that by the time it resolves, your original submit function will already be over (you'll have returned false to it).

So, what you then need to do is modify your success handler to do ... whatever it is that normally would happen when you submit. This might be as simple as form.submit() of a hidden form, or it might be more complex; I don't know your app. Hopefully this gives you the basic idea though.

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yes.. this makes sense. I originally had 'return true' inside the callback but it wasn't returning true on the form. I may switch it to a click function instead of a submit.. –  Damon Jun 19 '12 at 13:21
    
alright a clickhandler won't do it :/ I get the asynchronous part, and that's why it wasn't working. But I have no idea how to command the form to resubmit in a way that will work without getting caught in infinite loops and the conditions working properly (mainly not running the ajax if confirmation isn't required) –  Damon Jun 19 '12 at 15:58
    
There are several approaches. One is to use a different form entirely, and maybe copy your inputs over to it ... I wouldn't recommend that though. Another is to simply unbind your submit handler before invoking the submit a second time; this isn't a bad way to go. However, an even better way to go (IMHO) is to just use AJAX for the submission also. An AJAX request is same thing as a form submission (in most senses); in fact, in the "old days" of the web people did "AJAX" with iframes and form submissions. If your form uses GET as its method (the default), you can do something like: –  machineghost Jun 19 '12 at 17:06
    
$.get('http://' + urlToSubmitYourForm + '?' + $('#form').serialize()); $.serialize turns your form in a string of "?a=b&c=d" type stuff, with the contents of your form, and $.get "submits" it. Alternatively you can use POST too, but then you'll have to "serialize" the form in to a post object yourself. –  machineghost Jun 19 '12 at 17:09

I think your issue is that ajax calls are asynchronous by default - so the return value of the function is being evaluated before the success function is ever called, and therefore the submit variable is still false.

You need to either make the ajax call synchronous:

async: false

or probably better would be to restructure it.

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