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In my new job, I'm realizing how little I've actually used my C++ skills to date. I'm struggling through some self-imposed OOP practice now, and am stuck on a jagged array of classes.

Here's the code:

#define CAT_ONE_COUNT    6
#define CAT_TWO_COUNT    7
#define CAT_THREE_COUNT 20
#define CAT_FOUR_COUNT   5
#define CAT_FIVE_COUNT   4
#define CAT_SIX_COUNT   20

enum {CAT_ONE, CAT_TWO, CAT_THREE, CAT_FOUR, CAT_FIVE};

class EntryList
{
    private:
        ScheduleEntry* catOne[CAT_ONE_COUNT];
        ScheduleEntry* catTwo[CAT_TWO_COUNT];
        ScheduleEntry* catThree[CAT_THREE_COUNT];
        ScheduleEntry* catFour[CAT_FOUR_COUNT];
        ScheduleEntry* catFive[CAT_FIVE_COUNT];
        ScheduleEntry* catSix[CAT_SIX_COUNT];

        ScheduleEntry** entries[];

    public:
        EntryList();
        ~EntryList();

        std::string getEntry(int cat, int entry);
};

EntryList::EntryList()
{
    catOne[0] = new ScheduleEntry("Pressups");
    catOne[1] = new ScheduleEntry("Situps");
    catOne[2] = new ScheduleEntry("Squats");
    catOne[3] = new ScheduleEntry("Bench Work");
    catOne[4] = new ScheduleEntry("Partner Versions");
    catOne[5] = new ScheduleEntry("Running + Numbers");

    entries[CAT_ONE] = &catOne;
}

ScheduleEntry is (and the member functions are) defined elsewhere, obviously, and the error I get when trying to compile is the following:

gfi@testbox:~/test$ g++ -o test -std=c++0x main.cpp
In file included from main.cpp:6:
EntryList.h: In constructor ‘EntryList::EntryList()’:
EntryList.h:40: error: cannot convert ‘ScheduleEntry* (*)[6]’ to ‘ScheduleEntry**’ in assignment

After having read through the jagged array stuff I could find, this is the simplest and most readable way I could think to implement it. First things first - is it? Is there a simpler way?

Next (of course) the compiler error. How did I screw up the typing?

Thanks in advance. =)

EDIT:

Found the happy medium.

#define CAT_ONE_COUNT    6
#define CAT_TWO_COUNT    7
#define CAT_THREE_COUNT 20
#define CAT_FOUR_COUNT   5
#define CAT_FIVE_COUNT   4
#define CAT_SIX_COUNT   20

enum {CAT_ONE, CAT_TWO, CAT_THREE, CAT_FOUR, CAT_FIVE};

class EntryList
{
    private:
        ScheduleEntry** entries[6];

public:
    EntryList();
    ~EntryList();

    std::string getEntry(int cat, int entry);
};

EntryList::EntryList()
{
    entries[CAT_ONE] = new ScheduleEntry*[CAT_ONE_COUNT];
    entries[CAT_ONE][0] = new ScheduleEntry("Pushup");
    entries[CAT_ONE][1] = new ScheduleEntry("Situps");
    entries[CAT_ONE][2] = new ScheduleEntry("Squats");
    entries[CAT_ONE][3] = new ScheduleEntry("Bench Work");
    entries[CAT_ONE][4] = new ScheduleEntry("Partner Versions");
    entries[CAT_ONE][5] = new ScheduleEntry("Running + Numbers");
}
share|improve this question
    
Coming from C#? –  Jesse Good Jun 18 '12 at 22:30
1  
std::vector will make things a lot easier in managing the contents of the array. –  Captain Obvlious Jun 18 '12 at 22:31
    
Coming from C. =) –  musasabi Jun 18 '12 at 22:32
    
@CaptainObvlious: At the expense of locality of data and the possibility of many unnecessary allocations. A vector of vectors used as a matrix may be fine, but if the code is performance sensitive it will likely be slow, so test it. –  Ed S. Jun 18 '12 at 22:35
    
@EdS. The OP is more concerned about strengthening their C++ skills so code performance isn't really an issue. –  Captain Obvlious Jun 18 '12 at 22:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The syntax error is:

entries[CAT_ONE] = &catOne; // Arrays are secretly pointers so this won't work

Replace with:

entries[CAT_ONE] = catOne; // catOne is a ScheduleEntry* [], which is a ScheduleEntry**

You could probably get away with something like:

const int width = 6;
int height[width] = { 6, 7, 20, 5, 4, 20 };

ScheduleEntry*** entries = new (ScheduleEntry**)[width];
for (int i = 0; i < width; ++i) entries[i] = new (ScheduleEntry*)[height[i]];

entries[0][0] = new ScheduleEntry("Pressups");
entries[0][1] = new ScheduleEntry("Situps");
entries[0][2] = new ScheduleEntry("Squats");
entries[0][3] = new ScheduleEntry("Bench Work");
entries[0][4] = new ScheduleEntry("Partner Versions");
entries[0][5] = new ScheduleEntry("Running + Numbers");
// etc etc
share|improve this answer
    
That worked! Thank you. However, I'm failing to understand the purpose behind the triple indirection stuff. All I needed was an array of pointers which pointed to dynamically allocated arrays, right? –  musasabi Jun 18 '12 at 22:45
    
Well, you are storing your objects as pointers, so to keep a zero dimensional array (one object), you need a ScheduleEntry*. Arrays contiguous blocks of memory and are stored and treated as a pointer to the base address of the array (the beginning of its block of memory). So the first array is a pointer to an array of ScheduleEntry*. The outermost array is, thus, a pointer to a bunch of pointers, each of which point to a bunch of ScheduleEntry* (a ScheduleEntry***). Generally, to add another dimension, you go deeper by one pointer. Does that answer your question? –  Wug Jun 18 '12 at 22:51
    
Furthermore, this is why dynamic array allocations are usually similar to the form: Something * array = new Something[size]; –  Wug Jun 18 '12 at 22:53
    
Alright, I get that (I think, haha). However, removing the ampersand and then attempting to read through the list generated a seg fault. =) Seems like your triple indirection will be necessary, though GCC isn't liking your musings up there. –  musasabi Jun 18 '12 at 23:11
    
Got it. See above. Thanks again. =) –  musasabi Jun 19 '12 at 1:30

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