Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a general question on the class definition and its use..THe below code from one of the book works fine but I have a general questions.

Here we have defined a class Point and creating 2 instance Point1 & Point2. When calculating the distance for point2, how can we pass the point1 object?

Isn't point1 the point object, whereas the other_point is reprented as a variable.

Im little confused.

Code:

import math
class Point:
    def move(self, x, y):
        self.x = x
        self.y = y
    def reset(self):
        self.move(0, 0)
    def calculate_distance(self, other_point):
        print("Inside calculating distance")

        return math.sqrt(
                (self.x - other_point.x)**2 +
                (self.y - other_point.y)**2)

point1 = Point()
point2 = Point()
point1.reset()
point2.move(5,0)
print(point2.calculate_distance(point1))                    
share|improve this question
    
This site is not for mentoring. Please read a tutorial on python classes, objects, and methods. –  Marcin Jun 18 '12 at 23:32
8  
Aww c'mon! This is a programming forum, and this guy looks to be very new to python. Also, this wouldn't be the first time a mentoring style question has been asked on SO. –  inspectorG4dget Jun 18 '12 at 23:33
    
@inspectorG4dget Neither the first nor last time, but I think it is right to discourage them. –  Marcin Jun 18 '12 at 23:34
1  
Where is the __init__() function? Is it not necessary in this context? –  Mike Jun 18 '12 at 23:38
2  
@Michael, nothing. They don't exist yet. point3 = Point(); point3.calculate_distance(point1) will throw an error. –  senderle Jun 18 '12 at 23:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's what the self variable does. So when you are inside the definition of a class, you can use self to identify the object whose data you are trying to manipulate.

For example, suppose you have a class called human (which has a member variable named age), and every year, you want to increase the age of that human by calling the increment_age function. Then, you could write the following code:

class Human:
    def __init__(self):
        self.age = 0

    def increment_age(self):
        self.age += 1

>>> h = Human()
>>> print h.age
0
>>> h.increment_age()
>>> print h.age
1

So you see, by calling self, you are referring to the object itself. In your example, this would translate to self referring to point1.

Now, suppose that in the Human class, we want to add a function that allows two humans to fight. In this case, one human would have to fight another human (suppose that fighting another human increases your life by one and decreases the other human's life by one). In that case, you could write the following function within the Human class:

def fight(self, other_human):
    self.age += 1
    other_human.age -= 1

Now:

>>> h1 = Human()
>>> h2 = Human()
>>> h1.age = 5
>>> h2.age = 3
>>> print h1.age
5
>>> print h2.age
3
>>> h1.fight(h2)
>>> print h1.age
6
>>> print h2.age
2

Thus you can see in this example that h2 is the other_human in the fight function.

Hope that helps

share|improve this answer

When you create a Point object, several things happen.

point1 = Point()
point2 = Point()

One of the things that happens is that any methods belonging to the Point class are bound. What this means is that one of the arguments in the method is fixed, so that it always refers to the instance created. Let's look at the definition of calculate_distance.

def calculate_distance(self, other_point):
    print("Inside calculating distance")

    return math.sqrt(
            (self.x - other_point.x)**2 +
            (self.y - other_point.y)**2)

You can probably guess which argument is fixed. When Point() is called and an instance is created, the self parameter of calculate_distnace is fixed so that it always refers to that instance. So whenever you do this:

point1.calculate_distance(x)

You're doing the equivalent of this:

Point.calculate_distance(point1, x)

And whenever you do this:

point2.calculate_distance(point1)

You're doing the equivalent of this:

Point.calculate_distance(point2, point1)
share|improve this answer

Given your code, point2.calculate_distance(point1) calls calculate_distance with the object referred to by point2 as self, and the object referred to by point1 as other_point.

A good way to learn about these sorts of things is to use a visual debugger, and inspect the values in stack frames as the calls are made.

share|improve this answer

Inside calculate_distance, other_point is the name used to refer to whatever object is passed as an argument.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.