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I have a huge file with millions of columns, splited by space, but it only has a limited number of rows:

examples.txt:

1 2 3 4 5 ........
3 1 2 3 5 .........
l 6 3 2 2 ........

Now, I just want to read in the second column:

2
1
6

How do I do that in java with high performance.

Thanks

Update: the file is usually 1.4G containing hundreds of rows.

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Does every row contain the exact same number of characters? –  cheeken Jun 19 '12 at 0:06
    
no actually ... –  Feng Jun 19 '12 at 0:08
    
I'm lost. Is the format 1 digit followed by 1 space, etc. with exactly the same number of characters on each line? –  Gene Jun 19 '12 at 1:01
    
no the length varies but within a very limited range let's say 2048B –  Feng Jun 19 '12 at 1:11
    
Are the numbers always 1 digit? Thanks. –  Gene Jun 19 '12 at 1:29
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3 Answers

If your file is not statically structured, your only option is the naive one: read through the file byte sequence by byte sequence looking for newlines and grab the second column after each one. Use FileReader.

If your file were statically structured, you could calculate where in the file the second column would be for a given line and seek() to it directly.

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2  
do net read each line... just read a lot of bytes and iterate over it.. if the line is long, you block a long time while reading and the ram is full of it! –  headgrowe Jun 19 '12 at 0:28
    
I'm not sure what you mean. He was pretty clear in saying read by byte looking for newline characters, not by line. –  Gene Jun 19 '12 at 4:19
    
yes, i wanted to be more specific.. –  headgrowe Jun 19 '12 at 7:00
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I have to concur with @gene, try with a BufferedReader and getLine first, it's simple and easy to code. Just be careful not to alias the backing array between the result of getLine and any substring operation you use. String.substring() is a particularly common culprit, and I have had multi-MB byte-arrays locked in memory because a 3-char substring was referencing it.

Assuming ASCII, my preference when doing this is to drop down to the byte level. Use mmap to view the file as a ByteBuffer and then do a linear scan for 0x20 and 0x0A (assuming unix-style line separators). Then convert the relevant bytes to a String. If you are using an 8-bit charset it is extremely difficult to be faster than this.

If you are using Unicode the problem is sufficiently more complicated that I strongly urge you to use BufferedReader unless that performance really is unacceptable. If getLine() doesn't work, then consider just looping on a call to read().

Regardless you should always specify the Charset when initialising a String from an external bytestream. This documents your charset assumption explicitly. So I recommend a minor modification to gene's suggestion, so one of:

int i = Integer.parseInt(new String(buffer, start, length, "US-ASCII"));

int i = Integer.parseInt(new String(buffer, start, length, "ISO-8859-1"));

int i = Integer.parseInt(new String(buffer, start, length, "UTF-8"));

as appropriate.

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Here is a little state machine that uses a FileInputStream as its input and handles its own buffering. There is no locale conversion.

On my 7-year old 1.4 GHz laptop with 1/2 Gb of memory it takes 48 seconds to go through 1.28 billion bytes of data. Buffers bigger than 4Kb seem to run slower.

On a new 1-year old MacBook with 4Gb it runs in 14 seconds. After the file is in cache it runs in 2.7 seconds. Again there is no difference with buffers bigger than 4Kb. This is the same 1.2 billion byte data file.

I expect memory-mapped IO would do better, but this is probably more portable.

It will fetch any column you tell it to.

import java.io.*;
import java.util.Random;

public class Test {

public static class ColumnReader {

    private final InputStream is;
    private final int colIndex;
    private final byte [] buf;
    private int nBytes = 0;
    private int colVal = -1;
    private int bufPos = 0;

    public ColumnReader(InputStream is, int colIndex, int bufSize) {
        this.is = is;
        this.colIndex = colIndex;
        this.buf = new byte [bufSize];
    }

    /**
     * States for a tiny DFA to recognize columns.
     */
    private static final int START = 0;
    private static final int IN_ANY_COL = 1;
    private static final int IN_THE_COL = 2;
    private static final int WASTE_REST = 3;

    /**
     * Return value of colIndex'th column or -1 if none is found. 
     * 
     * @return value of column or -1 if none found.
     */
    public int getNext() {
        colVal = -1;
        bufPos = parseLine(bufPos);
        return colVal;
    }

    /**
     * If getNext() returns -1, this can be used to check if
     * we're at the end of file.
     * 
     * Otherwise the column did not exist.
     * 
     * @return end of file indication 
     */
    public boolean atEoF() {
        return nBytes == -1;
    }

    /**
     * Parse a line.  
     * The buffer is automatically refilled if p reaches the end.
     * This uses a standard DFA pattern.
     *
     * @param p position of line start in buffer
     * @return position of next unread character in buffer
     */
    private int parseLine(int p) {
        colVal = -1;
        int iCol = -1;
        int state = START;
        for (;;) {
            if (p == nBytes) {
                try {
                    nBytes = is.read(buf);
                } catch (IOException ex) {
                    nBytes = -1;
                }
                if (nBytes == -1) {
                    return -1;
                } 
                p = 0;
            }
            byte ch = buf[p++];
            if (ch == '\n') {
                return p;
            }
            switch (state) {
                case START:
                    if ('0' <= ch && ch <= '9') {
                        if (++iCol == colIndex) {
                            state = IN_THE_COL;
                            colVal = ch - '0';
                        } 
                        else { 
                            state = IN_ANY_COL;
                        }
                    }
                    break;

                case IN_THE_COL:
                    if ('0' <= ch && ch <= '9') {
                        colVal = 10 * colVal + (ch - '0');
                    }
                    else {
                        state = WASTE_REST;
                    }
                    break;

                case IN_ANY_COL:
                    if (ch < '0' || ch > '9') {
                        state = START;
                    }
                    break;

                case WASTE_REST:
                    break;
            }
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final String fn = "data.txt";
    if (args.length > 0 && args[0].equals("--create-data")) {
        PrintWriter pw;
        try {
            pw = new PrintWriter(fn);
        } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
            System.err.println(ex.getMessage());
            return;
        }
        Random gen = new Random();
        for (int row = 0; row < 100; row++) {
            int rowLen = 4 * 1024 * 1024 + gen.nextInt(10000);
            for (int col = 0; col < rowLen; col++) {
                pw.print(gen.nextInt(32));
                pw.print((col < rowLen - 1) ? ' ' : '\n');
            }
        }
        pw.close();
    }

    FileInputStream fis;
    try {
        fis = new FileInputStream(fn);
    } catch (FileNotFoundException ex) {
        System.err.println(ex.getMessage());
        return;
    }
    ColumnReader cr = new ColumnReader(fis, 1, 4 * 1024);
    int val;
    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    while ((val = cr.getNext()) != -1) {
        System.out.print('.');
    }
    long stop = System.currentTimeMillis();
    System.out.println("\nelapsed = " + (stop - start) / 1000.0);
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
as i sad "do net read each line... just read a lot of bytes and iterate over it.. if the line is long, you block a long time while reading and the ram is full of it!" ... by the way, an integer is 4 bytes long... therefore you could save the row without spaces and not like a string... the reading without conversion to a string is really faster..... use a FileInputStream... –  headgrowe Jun 19 '12 at 0:45
    
We are in violent agreement. I wrote to try the BufferedReader and getLine before he posted the true size of the file. It's never good to do tricky code optimization before you're sure they're necessary. –  Gene Jun 19 '12 at 4:26
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