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I'm using JNA to call into a C library from Java.

In my C code I have:

   void printStructArray( SomeStruct **someStruct, int arraySize );

This expects an array of pointers to struct, ie the method does this:

void printStructArray( SomeStruct **someStruct, int arraySize ) {
   for( int i = 0; i < arraySize; i++ ) {
      cout << "someStruct: " << someStruct[i]->aLong << " " << someStruct[i]->aString << " " << someStruct[i]->aDouble << endl;
   }
}

It's just a toy example, but I have an actual library I want to talk to which needs the same type of argument, but I think using a toy example is easier to explain here?

I've tried all sorts of things, but I'm not sure how to (i) declare this function in JNA (ii) call this function in JNA.

My latest (failed) attempt is:

SomeStruct.byReference[] structs = new SomeStruct.byReference[]{
        new SomeStruct.byReference(123,"hey!",1.23),
        new SomeStruct.byReference(456,"cool!",1.45),
        new SomeStruct.byReference(789,"world!",1.67) };
PointerByReference pointerByReference = new PointerByReference(structs[0].getPointer());
JniTest.instance.printStructArray(pointerByReference, 3);

This causes a SIGSEGV.

Alternatively:

SomeStruct.byReference[] structs = (SomeStruct.byReference[]) new SomeStruct().toArray( new SomeStruct.byReference[]{
        new SomeStruct.byReference(123,"hey!",1.23),
        new SomeStruct.byReference(456,"cool!",1.45),
        new SomeStruct.byReference(789,"world!",1.67) } );
PointerByReference pointerByReference = new PointerByReference(structs[0].getPointer());
JniTest.instance.printStructArray(pointerByReference, 3);

This causes an ArrayStoreException

Tried this also:

SomeStruct.byReference[] structs = new SomeStruct.byReference[]{
    new SomeStruct.byReference(123,"hey!",1.23),
    new SomeStruct.byReference(456,"cool!",1.45),
    new SomeStruct.byReference(789,"world!",1.67) };    JniTest.instance.printStructArray(structs, 3);

With method declared as:

void printStructArray(SomeStruct.byReference[] someStructarray, int num);

This gives '0' as the output from the function, although the good point is it doesn't crash, but it's not giving correct behavior either.

Thoughts?

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Since this is C++, don't you need to write a C interface library to the C++ code before trying to call with JNA? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 19 '12 at 1:12
    
Why the Java tag? –  Jim Garrison Jun 19 '12 at 1:42
    
@JimGarrison: He's asking about calling the C++ code in Java via JNI or JNA, so yes, this is Java-related. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 19 '12 at 1:57
    
So it's fixed now? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 19 '12 at 3:09
    
No, I'm just confirming it's a C interface. The problem with passing arrays of structs still stands. –  Hugh Perkins Jun 19 '12 at 3:10

4 Answers 4

It's sufficient to pass your array of Structure.ByReference; the address of the array is passed to the native code. JNA automatically allocates the space for the array of pointers, which goes out of scope after the function call.

PointerByReference is intended to pass a pointer value by reference (i.e. the callee may alter the value). It is not appropriate in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, interesting. I will try this now. –  Hugh Perkins Jun 19 '12 at 3:11
    
Tried it, and added the results to the problem description. I guess I might have implemented this incorrectly. In my implementation, this doesn't crash, but the C function doesn't print the structures out either, it just prints "0". –  Hugh Perkins Jun 19 '12 at 3:17
    
You need to invoke Structure.write() to sync the Java memory to native memory before your native function call. In most cases, JNA can auto-detect when this needs to happen, but apparently does not in this case. See if invoking Structure.write() on each of the array elements prior to your native call gives you the proper results. –  technomage Jun 20 '12 at 12:15
1  
I've patched JNA so that struct** arguments are properly synched around native function calls so you don't have to explicitly invoke Structure.write(). –  technomage Jun 24 '12 at 19:22
    
Ah interesting. But I already worked around the problem by writing a wrapper interface, in C. In the end, this was far less effort than trying to figure out how to directly connect to the underlying c interface from java/jna. –  Hugh Perkins Sep 28 '12 at 14:06

I've just found a solution that works quite nicely, which is to use BridJ instead of JNA. Maybe there is a way to get JNA working, but it doesn't seem obvious. BridJ is really easy to use:

Declaration:

public static native void printStructArray(Pointer<Pointer<SomeStruct > > someStruct, int arraySize);

Usage:

Pointer<Pointer<SomeStruct>> pointers = Pointer.allocatePointers(SomeStruct.class, 3);
pointers.set(0, Pointer.pointerTo( new SomeStruct().aDouble(1.58).aLong(5432).aString(Pointer.pointerToCString("Wheee!")) ) );
pointers.set(1, Pointer.pointerTo( new SomeStruct().aDouble(1.58).aLong(5432).aString(Pointer.pointerToCString("Wheee!")) ) );
pointers.set(2, Pointer.pointerTo( new SomeStruct().aDouble(1.58).aLong(5432).aString(Pointer.pointerToCString("Wheee!")) ) );
JnitestLibrary.printStructArray(pointers, 3 );

It seems they dont support structures by value, but I dont have any structures by value in my current interface, so that's not a problem for me right now. Apparently performance is ok, but I haven't tested performance personally.

Note that I'm still open to JNA solutions, and will tick anyone who can give me a working JNA solution to the problem.

share|improve this answer

Is this C or C++?

If C, why don't you simply use calloc/malloc to allocate the double pointer for the structure as follows?

somestruct = (SomeStruct **)calloc(arraySize, sizeof(SomeStruct *));

for (i = 0; i < arraySize; i++)

    somestruct[i] = (SomeStruct *)calloc(1, sizeof(SomeStruct));

Now, you can fill the structures as you want.

share|improve this answer
    
The use of cout << something makes me think it is probably not C. ;-) –  Rudy Velthuis Jun 19 '12 at 1:20
    
And perhaps all the -> operators! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 19 '12 at 1:21
    
I've added a short description of JNA to the start of the problem description, since it seems starting the description with "In C, " give the impression this is a C question :-D –  Hugh Perkins Jun 19 '12 at 3:09
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the end, I never found a working solution to this. What I did was workaround by writing a wrapper interface, in C, which presented a very simple interface to Java, which was then very easy to link to using JNA, without needing Pointer and so on. This worked quite well, and was less effort than trying to get Pointer working.

So, my interface looked something like:

int createHandle()
void doSomething( int handle )
void releaseHandle( int handle)

It seemed to take a lot less effort to get this working, in terms of time, than trying to create some super complicated jna implementation to directly connect to the underlying c interface.

The other advantage is this meant it was easy to connect to a c++ library, since this way, the c++ interface is wrapped by a c interface, which is easy to connect to.

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