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Say I have a list of integers:

List<int> myInts = new List<int>() {1,2,3,5,8,13,21};

I would like to get the next available integer, ordered by increasing integer. Not the last or highest one, but in this case the next integer that is not in this list. In this case the number is 4.

Is there a LINQ statement that would give me this? As in:

var nextAvailable = myInts.SomeCoolLinqMethod();

Edit: Crap. I said the answer should be 2 but I meant 4. I apologize for that!

For example: Imagine that you are responsible for handing out process IDs. You want to get the list of current process IDs, and issue a next one, but the next one should not just be the highest value plus one. Rather, it should be the next one available from an ordered list of process IDs. You could get the next available starting with the highest, it does not really matter.

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2  
next available . With reference to what? –  Chandu Jun 19 '12 at 1:46
    
I think you Are looking for an ordered list –  Gonzalo.- Jun 19 '12 at 1:47
    
Next with respect to the increasing integers. So yes, this is for an ordered list, so integer comparison is relevant. –  Daniel Williams Jun 19 '12 at 1:51
1  
to order the list, use myInts OrderBy(d => d). If it's ordered, the myInts[0] will be the smaller number, so myInts[1] will be the nextAvailable –  Gonzalo.- Jun 19 '12 at 1:55

5 Answers 5

up vote -1 down vote accepted
public static class IntExtensions
{
    public static int? SomeCoolLinqMethod(this IEnumerable<int> ints)
    {
        int counter = ints.Count() > 0 ? ints.First() : -1;

        while (counter < int.MaxValue)
        {
            if (!ints.Contains(++counter)) return counter;
        }

        return null;
    }
}

Usage:

var nextAvailable = myInts.SomeCoolLinqMethod();
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Thank you this is basically what I have implemented in my local int extensions class. I was not sure is there was something already which would do this, but with this method at least there is one locally. –  Daniel Williams Jun 19 '12 at 2:29
    
The big problem with this method is its lack of efficiency when ints is non-trivial or coming from a database. –  user7116 Jun 20 '12 at 15:10
    
But that is not the problem I was trying to solve. Optimization is best left until after the main logic is in place, and only IF it is needed. –  Daniel Williams Jun 23 '12 at 1:54

I see a lot of answers that write a custom extension method, but it is possible to solve this problem with the standard linq extension methods and the static Enumerable class:

List<int> myInts = new List<int>() {1,2,3,5,8,13,21};

// This will set firstAvailable to 4.
int firstAvaiable = Enumerable.Range(1, Int32.MaxValue).Except(myInts).First();
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The answer provided by @Kevin has a undesirable performance profile. The logic will access the source sequence numerous times: once for the .Count call, once for the .FirstOrDefault call, and once for each .Contains call. If the IEnumerable<int> instance is a deferred sequence, such as the result of a .Select call, this will cause at least 2 calculations of the sequence, along with once for each number. Even if you pass a list to the method, it will potentially go through the entire list for each checked number. Imagine running it on the sequence { 1, 1000000 } and you can see how it would not perform well.

LINQ strives to iterate source sequences no more than once. This is possible in general and can have a big impact on the performance of your code. Below is an extension method which will iterate the sequence exactly once. It does so by looking for the difference between each successive pair, then adds 1 to the first lower number which is more than 1 away from the next number:

public static int? FirstMissing(this IEnumerable<int> numbers)
{
    int? priorNumber = null;

    foreach(var number in numbers.OrderBy(n => n))
    {
        var difference = number - priorNumber;

        if(difference != null && difference > 1)
        {
            return priorNumber + 1;
        }

        priorNumber = number;
    }

    return priorNumber == null ? (int?) null : priorNumber + 1;
}

Since this extension method can be called on any arbitrary sequence of integers, we make sure to order them before we iterate. We then calculate the difference between the current number and the prior number. If this is the first number in the list, priorNumber will be null and thus difference will be null. If this is not the first number in the list, we check to see if the difference from the prior number is exactly 1. If not, we know there is a gap and we can add 1 to the prior number.

You can adjust the return statement to handle sequences with 0 or 1 items as you see fit; I chose to return null for empty sequences and n + 1 for the sequence { n }.

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This will be fairly efficient:

static int Next(this IEnumerable<int> source)
{
    int? last = null;
    foreach (var next in source.OrderBy(_ => _))
    {
        if (last.HasValue && last.Value + 1 != next)
        {
            return last.Value + 1;
        }

        last = next;
    }

    return last.HasValue ? last.Value + 1 : Int32.MaxValue;
}
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Ok, here is the solution that I came up with that works for me.

var nextAvailableInteger = Enumerable.Range(myInts.Min(),myInts.Max()).FirstOrDefault( r=> !myInts.Contains(r));

If anyone has a more elegant solution I would be happy to accept that one. But for now, this is what I'm putting in my code and moving on.

Edit: this is what I implemented after Kevin's suggestion to add an extension method. And that was the real answer - that no single LINQ extension would do so it makes more sense to add my own. That is really what I was looking for.

public static int NextAvailableInteger(this IEnumerable<int> ints)
{
    return NextAvailableInteger(ints, 1); // by default we use one
}
public static int NextAvailableInteger(this IEnumerable<int> ints, int defaultValue)
{
    if (ints == null || ints.Count() == 0) return defaultValue;

    var ordered = ints.OrderBy(v => v);
    int counter = ints.Min();
    int max = ints.Max();

    while (counter < max)
    {
        if (!ordered.Contains(++counter)) return counter;
    }
    return (++counter);
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you're using LINQ-to-Objects you may not notice anything. If you're using LINQ-to-SQL this would perform really really poorly. You're calling multiple LINQ functions, all which could require traversing the entire enumeration! You also already have the ordered list, so the min is the first one and the max is the last one. –  user7116 Jun 20 '12 at 0:42
    
This is just for Linq to Objects. Thanks though. –  Daniel Williams Jun 20 '12 at 19:05

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