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I am trying to use 'git log --pretty=tformat' to create xml file log. However I have problem getting the list of file for each commit.

for example: I use this command

$echo '<?xml version="1.0"?>' > out.xml
$echo '<git>' >> out.xml
$git log   --pretty=tformat:'    <commit>%n        <h1>%s</h1>%n    </commit>'  --name-only  >> out.xml
$echo '</git>'>> out.xml

the output:

    <?xml version="1.0"?>
<git>
    <commit>
        <h1>Commit 1</h1>
    </commit>
    <commit>
        <h1>Commit 2</h1>
    </commit>
    <commit>
        <h1>Commit 3</h1>
    </commit>
</git>

I want to add tag in side the commit tag with the list of files so my final output look like this

    <?xml version="1.0"?>
    <git>
        <commit>
            <h1>Commit 1</h1>
            <list>file1</list>
        </commit>
        <commit>
            <h1>Commit 2</h1>
            <list>file2</list>
        </commit>
        <commit>
            <h1>Commit 3</h1>
            <list>file3</list>
        </commit>
    </git>  

I did try --name-only it will list the file but cannot format the output.

Any help would be much appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
A bit unrelated to the actual problem, but constructing XML in cases like this may be a bit simpler if you have a look at xml2. –  user1338062 Jun 19 '12 at 8:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This might not be what you're looking for, but it's easy to script. The following is one implementation, inefficient but functional. Careful running it: It will operate on your entire history. Change the second line to revlist=$(git rev-list -10 HEAD) to see it work on just the last 10 commits. It also assumes you want older commits at the bottom of the file, per your example above. Add a --reverse flag to git rev-list if you'd prefer chronological order:

#!/bin/sh
revlist=$(git rev-list HEAD)
(
    echo '<?xml version="1.0"?>'
    echo '<git>'
    for rev in $revlist
    do
            files=$(git log -1 --pretty="format:" --name-only $rev)
            echo '    <commit>\n        <h1>\c'
            echo "$(git log -1 --pretty="%s" $rev)\c"
            echo '</h1>'
            for file in $files
            do
                    echo "        <list>$file</list>"
            done
            echo '    </commit>'
    done
    echo '</git>'
) > out.xml
share|improve this answer
    
amazing, many thanks. –  Flan Alflani Jun 19 '12 at 5:04
    
nice one! Is there a way to get the information such as whether the file was modified or deleted or added? –  Nikhil Gupta Sep 22 '13 at 17:59
1  
@NikhilGupta: Yeah, try replacing --name-only with --name-status. The short codes printed before the file names are designed to be machine parseable. Search this page for "--diff-filter" to see what the codes mean. Then just add some logic to process those codes, and there you go. –  Christopher Sep 23 '13 at 0:17

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