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Why doesn't StringBuilder have a trim() method? How can we trim a StringBuilder value without using StringBuilder.toString().trim()?

Actually i am in a loop where i have to compare this StringBuilder string with many other values so if i call StringBuilder.toString().trim() each time, it will create a new instance and i don't want to create a new String object each time

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closed as not constructive by EJP, casperOne Jun 19 '12 at 12:16

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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May I ask why don't you want to use StringBuilder.toString().trim() ? – Kazekage Gaara Jun 19 '12 at 5:06
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Actually i am in a loop where i have to compare this StringBuilder string with many other values so if i call StringBuilder.toString().trim() each time, it will create a new instance and i don't want to create a new String object each time. – Pramod Kumar Jun 19 '12 at 5:09
    
You can use toString().trim() as many times as you need. Please edit your question and add your previous comment to clarify. – mschonaker Jun 19 '12 at 5:12
    
If it did have a trim() method there would presumably be questions asking why? Not a real question. – EJP Jun 19 '12 at 8:03
    
@EJP - How do I unlock this question ? I want to add the code to trim a StringBuilder. – Borat Sagdiyev Dec 11 '14 at 7:31
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Why does StringBuilder don't have trim() method

  1. Because that's the way it was designed. Try asking the designers.
  2. Because there is not much call for it.
  3. Because the String trim() semantics and signature is a poor fit for mutable strings, though that is debatable.

Either way, the answer is not relevant to solving your problem.

and how can we trim a StringBuilder value?

The simplest way is to use StringBuilder.toString().trim() ...

I don't want to use StringBuilder.toString().trim().

In that case, so you need to do what trim() does under the covers: match and remove the leading and trailing white-space. Since the StringBuilder API has no regex support, you'll need to do this that hard way; i.e. by iterating the characters from the front forward and end backward to see what characters need to be removed, etcetera.

Are you sure you wouldn't prefer to do it the easy way? If not, this Q&A has some example implementations, analysis, benchmarking, etcetera:


Actually i am in a loop where i have to compare this StringBuilder string with many other values so if i call StringBuilder.toString().trim() each time, it will create a new instance and i don't want to create a new String object each time.

The flip-side is that removing characters from the start of a StringBuilder entails copying all of the remaining characters.

Maybe you would be better off turning the complete StringBuilder into a String to start with, then when you use trim() and substring() and the like, you won't be copying characters. (These methods work by creating a new String that shares the backing array of the original String ... so you only end up copying the string's control information. UPDATE - In Java 7 they changed the behavior of trim and substring so that they used a String constructor that copies a subarray of the backing array.)

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Was going through a similar answer of yours : stackoverflow.com/questions/7510422/… . And I would say you have answered this perfectly well. – Kazekage Gaara Jun 19 '12 at 5:14
    
@KazekageGaara - thankyou :-) – Stephen C Jun 19 '12 at 5:18
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"Why doesn't X happen? because it doesn't". Very constructive. Do you happen to know any of the reasons why the designers didn't implement toString()? – Buffalo Jun 19 '12 at 5:51
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@Buffalo What reason do you have for thinking that anybody here knows exactly what the designers of Java were thinking? – EJP Jun 19 '12 at 8:04
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@Buffalo - I could have, but I didn't because I think it is a valid point to make. And read my comments (and EJPs) for the reasons why I (we) think it is a valid point. Any Question that asks why a closed-room decision making process gave a particular result is non-constructive. The only objectively valid answer is to say "Ask them" ... or "We'll never know". And that's what I did. (In fact, questions like this are often just thinly disguised whinges ... which is another reason to call them unconstructive.) – Stephen C Jun 20 '12 at 4:17

I don't know what you are trying to achieve, but if you're worried about performance perhaps you could perform the trim as you are appending to the StringBuilder.

stringbuilder.append(string.trim())

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Why does StringBuilder don't have trim() method?

Hmm.. StringBuilder is like String, just a little difference that it can be modified after creation else it is same as string.

StringBuilder

As stated in above link, The principal operations on a StringBuilder are the append and insert methods. I guess they are proposed to support mutable strings, same as with StringBuffer. And if you can get things done by a small call to some other method and then desired method then whats the matter. Why you want same implementation in multiple classes.

How can we trim a StringBuilder value?

As said by others stringBuilder.toString().trim();

I don't want to use StringBuilder.toString().trim().

Hmm... matter of choice, any specific reason for this?

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Actually i am in a loop where i have to compare this StringBuilder string with many other values so if i call StringBuilder.toString().trim() each time, it will create a new instance and i don't want to create a new String object each time – Pramod Kumar Jun 19 '12 at 5:15
    
Use your own char[] and delimiters then. Check out java.lang.String code. – mschonaker Jun 19 '12 at 5:17

Use StringBuilder.toString().trim() but save it in a variable.

eg.

String myTrimmedString = myStringBuilder.toString().trim();

It doesn't have a trim() method because it is very easy and somewhat preferred to use immutable objects. Imagine one thread is trimming the StringBuilder while another is appending to it. Imagine the bugs and weirdness that could cause in your code.

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Imagine one thread is trimming the StringBuilder while another is appending to it. This situation can also be occur in append operation while one thread is appending something and one is append something else... so what in that case? it should not support append as well – Pramod Kumar Jun 19 '12 at 5:28
    
@PramodKumar I would imagine the VM only lets one thing write to the char[] at a time. However putting the same restriction on reads would be ridiculous. On a simultaneous read and write I would guess it blocks the read, making this a non-issue. It all depends on implementation of the VM. It is very possible trim() would work fine. It was a hypothetical situation to show how much easier it can be to implement immutable objects. And they use less memory. – Koalaboy Jun 19 '12 at 5:54
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Although your solution is correct, your justification is way off. StringBuilder isn't thread-safe by design*, so, as Pramod Kumar said, any concurrent operation on it is dangerous. Anyone who uses a StringBuilder in multiple threads without synchronizing on it needs shooting. StringBuffer is the thread-safe version of StringBuilder, as it uses internal synchronization. *(StringBuilder was introduced into Java for situations where you're certain only one thread will ever access it at a time and so wanted to do without the overhead of syncronization in StringBuffer.) – daiscog Nov 13 '14 at 12:43

You can convert StringBuilder instance to string which later can be trimmed.

sb.toString().trim();//sb is stringBuilder Instance.
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