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When I have the following code in A.cpp and B.cpp there is no warning or error generated, but Initializer::Initializer() in B.cpp gets called twice while the one in A.cpp doesn't get called.

static int x = 0;

struct Initializer
{
    Initializer()
    {
        x = 10;
    }
};

static Initializer init;

Since this is breaking the one definition rule and causing undefined behavior I think this is perfectly normal. However, when I move the constructor definition outside of the class declaration in either or both files, like this:

static int x = 0;

struct Initializer
{
    Initializer();
};

Initializer::Initializer()
{
    x = 10;
}

static Initializer init;

The linker suddenly becomes smart enough to error and say one or more multiply defined symbols found. What changed here and why did it matter? I would have thought the linker should always be able to detect ODR breakage - what are the cases when it can't?

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but my theory is that when you have templated code (where the definitions are always in headers) you end up with duplicated definitions in many compilation units. They happen to all be identical, so it doesn't matter if the linker just chooses one and orphans the others, but it can't error that there are multiple definitions or templates wouldn't work.

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Do you still get the linking error if you put inline in front of the externally defined constructor? –  jxh Jun 19 '12 at 6:03
    
@user315052 No, actually. Interesting. –  Dave Jun 19 '12 at 6:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your second example has an obvious and easy to diagnose violation of the one definition rule. It has two definitions of a non-inline function with external linkage. This is easy for the linker to diagnose as the violation is obvious from the names of the functions contained in the object files that it is linking.

Your first example breaks the one definition rule in a much subtler way. Because functions defined in a class body are implicitly declared inline you have to examine the function bodies to determine that the one definition rule has been violated.

For this reason alone I am not surprised that your implementation fails to spot the violation (I didn't the first time around). Obviously the violation is impossible for the compiler to spot when looking at one source file in isolation but it may be that the information to detect the violation and link time is not actually present the object files that are passed to the linker. It is certainly beyond the scope of what I'd expect a linker to find.

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The multiply defined symbol error occurs when multiple translation units each have the same name signature for an item with external linkage, except if they are inlined functions or methods.

Inlined functions are typically not subject to ODR at compile time. If they were, inlined implementations of methods would break everywhere. However, the ODR is applied retroactively during link time, in that one inline function is chosen. So, inline functions with the same signature are expected to behave identically. Your inline constructors violate that expectation.

If instead you had declared a template in a header file, like this:

#ifndef I_HH
#define I_HH
tempalte <typename T>
struct Initializer {
    Initializer () { x = 10; }
};
#endif

and used this to be included in both A.cpp and B.cpp, and in each you created a static instance:

static int x;
#include "i.hh"
static Initializer<int> init;

I believe the compiler should complain about an improperly formed template (g++ did anyway), which is as good as detecting a violation of ODR (that the constructors would behave differently in different contexts).

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I hope the multiple definitions which aren't chosen by the linker are stripped; Can such a thing be done after linking? What I'm getting at is: Do templates cause bloat? –  Dave Jun 19 '12 at 7:30
    
I believe the whole point of choosing one is to remove the others, if they can be removed (they may not if they do something hairy, like contain function local static variables). I am not sure how the dynamic linker treats multiple libraries that have the same template instantiations, though. –  jxh Jun 19 '12 at 7:38

if you have the implement of function within the class defination, the function is inlined which don't required to linked. So there has no error. There must has one definition, but doesn't matter it is included by different cpp file. for example, you defined one class in a header file but include the header file in different cpp files.

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