Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I came across a pseudocode which I am unable to implement because, I am unable to understand it:

i, c := 0,0;
do i ≠ n →
    if v = b[i]           → c, i := c + 2, i + 1
       c = i               → c, i, v := c + 2, i + 1, b[i]
       c ≠ i ^ v ≠ b[i]    → i := i + 1
    fi
od

I think that tis pseudocode is about finding the value v which has occurred more than n / 2 times in b[].

share|improve this question
1  
OK...but what's the question? –  Neowizard Jun 19 '12 at 6:13
    
I think this question belongs on Programmers.SE. –  Mr Lister Jun 19 '12 at 6:13
    
What exactly you cannot understand? The notation of pseudo code or why does it work correctly? –  SPIRiT_1984 Jun 19 '12 at 6:15
    
@Neowizard I am unable to understand the notation of the pseudo code. –  Snehasish Jun 19 '12 at 6:15
    
What are you trying to implement ! What does this pseudo code supposed to be doing("sorts number", " kills racoons" ? –  Jay D Jun 19 '12 at 6:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The three conditions in the if are alternatives, they should be translated to an if-else if-else chain. The assignment-like statements c,i,v := c+2, i+1, b[i] are multiple assignments, as far as I know like the Python multiple assignments, so the i in b[i] refers to the old value of i. That yields

// n and v are initialised to something sensible, hopefully
i = 0;
c = 0;
while(i != n) {
    if (b[i] == v) {
        c = c + 2;
        i = i + 1;
    } else if (c == i) {
        c = c + 2;
        v = b[i];  // conjecture that the b[i] on the RHS refers to the old i
        i = i + 1;
    } else {
        i = i + 1;
    }
}

Since i is incremented in every branch, we can lift that out, and get

for(i = 0, c = 0; i != n; ++i) {
    if (b[i] == v) {
        c += 2;
    } else if (c == i) {
        c += 2;
        v = b[i];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But what have you done with the condition : c ≠ i ^ v ≠ b[i] You have neglected it completely !! –  Snehasish Jun 19 '12 at 8:39
2  
That condition is a consequence of the two others being false. It translates to c != i && v != b[i], which is exactly the case if neither of the two first conditions is true, so in the first loop, it's the final else, in the second loop, it need not appear because in that case the only thing that is done is incrementing i which happens in all cases. –  Daniel Fischer Jun 19 '12 at 8:43
    
I got it now.. !! Thanks.. –  Snehasish Jun 19 '12 at 8:47

Whoa, this isn't what I expected to ever see. It looks like Dijkstra's do-od notation (not sure what's a good reference, maybe this: http://www.cs.grinnell.edu/~stone/courses/compilers/introduction-to-Dijkstra.pdf).

Roughly what this is doing is a series of guarded checks. If some condition holds, then do the implication. As for implementing something in do-od notation, I'm not too sure. Something along the lines of:

i = c = 0;
while (i != n) {
    if (v == b[i]) {
        c = c+2, i = i+1;
        if (c == i) c = c+2, i = i + 1, v = b[i];
        if (c != i || v != b[i]) i = i + 1
    }
}

No idea what those intermediate variables are, and I've always conceptualized do-od programs as something closer to hardware (with everything running and testing in parallel). Good luck

share|improve this answer
    
its falling into an infinite loop !!! :( –  Snehasish Jun 19 '12 at 7:29
    
I have no idea what n, v, or b should be set as before starting...See if figuring out the do-od notation helps at all. –  Michael Jun 19 '12 at 7:39
    
Those assignments are supposed to happen concurrently, so you're using the wrong i to index b[i] in the c == i case. Also, the if has three independent guards, so the v == b[i] test should just be one of a three-way branch. –  Jim Balter Jun 19 '12 at 11:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.