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I am reading about closures in "Javascript: The Good Parts" book.

There is following example of using closures:

var add_the_handlers = function (nodes) {
var i;
   for (i = 0; i < nodes.length; i += 1) {
      nodes[i].onclick = function (i) {
         return function (e) {
            alert(i + ":" + e);
         };
      }(i);
   }
};

Is it correct example? Or much correct example would be following?

var add_the_handlers = function (nodes) {
var i;
   for (i = 0; i < nodes.length; i += 1) {
      nodes[i].onclick = function (idx) {
         return function (e) {
            alert(idx + ":" + e);
         };
      }(i);
   }
};

Variable i in the outer function and variable i in the inner function "nodes[i].onclick = function (i)" - it is two different variables. And third function accesses variable from second function, not from the outermost.
Am I correct?

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1  
Both versions do the same thing. In my opinion your version is easier to read since the variable names are different. In a general sense, when you have variables of the same name in different scopes, the one that will be used is the one defined closest to (or in) the current scope. –  nnnnnn Jun 19 '12 at 6:30
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The two examples are identical. The whole point of a closure is to make an outer-scoped variable (i) into an inner-scoped variable (i/idx/foo, take your pick). The closure creates a "copy" of the variable, so that when the callback gets made, it has the correct value.

// outer-scoped i changes on each iteration
var i;

for (i = 0; i < nodes.length; i += 1) {
   nodes[i].onclick = function (i) {

      // here i now refers to a different variable; while the outer i keeps iterating,  
      //this i is preserved at its current value.
      return function (e) {
         alert(i + ":" + e);
      };
   }(i);
}
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Are you sure that closure creates a "copy" of the variable? From the book - "It is important to understand that the inner function has access to the actual variables of the outer functions and not copies in order to avoid the following problem". –  Vladimir Bezugliy Jun 19 '12 at 8:28
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Yes, the example correct. The i variable that you see as function parameter takes precedence over the outer i variable because it is declared in the local scope.

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From javascript point of view - these two are identical. Therefore it's the question of taste. If you would have more closures inside, then it would be a good idea to use different names. But here the example is so simple - there is no need for that.

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From javascript point of view - these two examples are identical. But it is rather difficult to understand that there are two different variables i in following function call - "function (i) {} (i)". –  Vladimir Bezugliy Jun 19 '12 at 9:40
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No, the two examples you posted is exactly the same. The only difference is just the parameter name for an function, but that doesn't matter, you could use whatever.

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